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Leaked images show the HTC One A9 from all angles

Leaked images show the HTC One A9 from all angles
Leaked images show the HTC One A9 from all angles
The HTC One A9 "Aero" was rumored to launch as early as September. New pictures purportedly show a dummy model of what the One A9 might look.

HTC is once again in the red for Q3 2015 according to the company's own financial reports released on October 5. The stakes are high as the upcoming One A9 will have to do the impossible and put HTC back in the spotlight it once held in the early days of Android.

The One A9 has remained well under wraps. A recent leak from @OnLeaks purportedly show a final version of the One A9. The design itself appears to be mix aspects of the One M8 with the recent iPhone 6 series. Early rumors suggested an official announcement on September 29, but HTC instead announced the One M9+ Camera Edition with 21 MP rear camera, OIS, and laser auto-focus. Thus, the rest of the world is still waiting for the true successor to the well-received One M9.

Recent rumors also point to the One A9 with a Snapdragon 617 SoC, 2 GB RAM, 5-inch FHD display, 16 GB eMMC, 13 MP rear camera, 2150 mAh, and Android 6.0 Marshmallow. With only a couple months left in the year, HTC is running out of time to show what it has under its sleeve for the Holidays.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 10 > Leaked images show the HTC One A9 from all angles
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-10-13 (Update: 2015-10-13)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.