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HTC One A9 "Hima Aero" may sport Snapdragon 617 SoC

HTC One A9 "Hima Aero" may sport Snapdragon 617 SoC
HTC One A9 "Hima Aero" may sport Snapdragon 617 SoC
According to leaked information, the next HTC phone should be officially announced later this month with the brand new octa-core Snapdragon processor.

Rumblings of a new HTC "Hero" smartphone began early June. The smartphone is codenamed "Aero" and is expected to generate revenue for the manufacturer to get through the upcoming Holiday season. New rumors suggest that this HTC One A9 "Aero" smartphone will be unveiled alongside the Butterfly 3 during a press event on September 29. While official details are still behind curtains, @evleaks has dropped some hardware hints regarding the mysterious HTC phone.

According to the Tweet, the HTC One A9 "Hima Aero" will ship with the newly announced Snapdragon 617 and Adreno 405 GPU. It will have 2 GB RAM, 16 GB of internal storage, and a 5-inch 1080p AMOLED display. Other features include a 13 MP rear camera, 4 MP front camera, MicroSD slot, integrated fingerprint sensor, a 2150 mAh battery, 6 different color options, and a thickness of just 7 mm.

HTC has already confirmed that it plans to launch a new flagship smartphone before the end of the year. Sales for the One M9 have been lower than expected despite earning great reviews. Word-of-mouth and media coverage for HTC were buried under rumors and reports of the then upcoming Galaxy Note 5, Galaxy Edge+, and OnePlus 2.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 09 > HTC One A9 "Hima Aero" may sport Snapdragon 617 SoC
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-09-16 (Update: 2015-09-17)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.