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HTC One A9 executive responds to iPhone clone claims

HTC One A9 executive responds to iPhone clone claims
HTC One A9 executive responds to iPhone clone claims
The HTC representative says we've all got it the other way around -- It was Apple who copied HTC.

Ever since the initial leaks of the upcoming HTC One A9, users have been pointing fingers at the Taiwanese manufacturer for blatantly copying the design of the Apple iPhone. Indeed, it is hard to deny the striking similarities between the smartphones as both designs share the same rounded edges and corners with parallel stripes on the back.

The accusation has gotten so out-of-hand between media and fans that even HTC executives are having to jump in to ease the tension. President of HTC North Asia Jack Tong responded to the claims during a press conference on the official launch of the One A9.

According to wantchinatimes.com, Tong says that the uni-body metal-clad phone was designed two years ago in 2013. Furthermore, he added that it was Apple who copied their antenna design and specific placement on the rear of the phone. This same wide-strip antenna was used for the One M7 and its metal housing. Tong suggests that the A9 is simply a natural progression forward based on its older M7 and M8 designs.

The HTC One A9 launches later this year starting for 600 Euros.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 10 > HTC One A9 executive responds to iPhone clone claims
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-10-24 (Update: 2015-10-25)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.