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Leaked images purportedly shows iPhone 7 design

Leaked images purportedly shows iPhone 7 design
Leaked images purportedly shows iPhone 7 design
The images show a flushed rear camera and suggests the absence of the ubiquitous 3.5 mm audio port.

An alleged iPhone supplier has leaked a couple of images showing the chassis of the back cover of the iPhone 7 and the inside of the cover as well. A supposed rendering was published on Nowhereelse.fr, though "leaked" information like these should always be taken with a grain of salt.

If the images are to be taken as truth, then the next generation of iPhones will have a less conspicuous antenna strip on the back cover. The housing for the iSight camera will also be more flushed with the surface in order to cut back on the "camera hump" commonly found on other smartphone designs. Dual cameras for the supposed iPhone 7 Plus or iPhone 7 Pro are still a possibility.

Recent rumors suggest that the iPhone 7 will be even thinner than the current iPhone 6s, which is about 7.1 mm thin. Additionally, there appears to be no headphone jack based on these images of the iPhone 7, which falls in line nicely with earlier rumors about Apple dropping the common 3.5 mm headphone jack in favor of a Lightning port and a thinner design.

Apple is expected to unveil new and updated products come March 21st during a live press conference.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 03 > Leaked images purportedly shows iPhone 7 design
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-03-14 (Update: 2016-03-14)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.