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Apple iPhone SE production costs estimated to be $160 USD

Apple iPhone SE production costs estimated to be $160 USD
Apple iPhone SE production costs estimated to be $160 USD
The company is expected to pocket even more from the $500 64 GB version compared to the $400 16 GB version.

The new iPhone SE is expected to have wide profit margins like its higher-end siblings according to the latest estimates from IHS. By researching and investigating the bill of materials and comparing manufacturing costs to the related iPhone 5c and iPhone 5s, the firm estimates that a single iPhone SE will cost apple just $160 USD to manufacture against a retail price of $400 for the 16 GB version. In comparison, the iPhone 5c and 5s were more expensive to produce at roughly $175 and $199, respectively.

iPhone SE to be very profitable for Apple

IHS is speculating that a large chunk of customers who are already interested in the 4-inch iPhone may opt in for the pricier $500 64 GB version for additional storage due to the lack of a MicroSD reader. If so, Apple is expected to profit an additional $89 per unit sold compared to the $400 16 GB version.

Three different manufacturers will provide displays for the iPhone SE

While every iPhone SE will come with a multi-touch 1136 x 640 resolution touchscreen (325 PPI), the provider for these panels can vary between three companies. IHS predicts that about 40 percent of all iPhone SE units will carry panels from Japan Display, 35 percent from LG, and 25 percent from Sharp. Sharp was recently acquired by Foxconn for 3.15 billion Euros.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 04 > Apple iPhone SE production costs estimated to be $160 USD
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-04- 8 (Update: 2016-04- 8)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.