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Intel Rocket Lake-S will top-out at eight cores max and may not launch in 2020; Early Gen12 Xe scores indicate a 10% higher performance for the Willow Cove backport compared to Ice Lake 32 EU

Intel Rocket Lake-S looks to aim for higher IPC than higher core counts. (Image Source: Intel)
Intel Rocket Lake-S looks to aim for higher IPC than higher core counts. (Image Source: Intel)
Intel's upcoming 11th gen 14nm Rocket Lake-S processor for mainstream desktop users may not launch this year, according to a recent performance enthusiast roadmap from Intel. Rocket Lake-S looks to bank on improved IPCs than raw core counts and early 3DMark Fire Strike and Time Spy scores of the 32 EU Gen12 Xe iGPU indicate about a 10% improvement over Ice Lake UHD Graphics G1.

Rocket Lake-S is touted to be the successor to Intel 10th gen Comet Lake-S. Comet Lake is already being seen as a saturation point for what is essentially the 14nm Skylake architecture that has been refined over the years. Sure, the Core i9-10900K offers higher clocks, a couple of extra cores, and improved overclocking, but the 10th gen Comet Lake-S does not seem to offer any real incentive to upgrade for the average Joe/Jane already rocking 9th gen parts. Now, several new leaked benchmarks indicate that Rocket Lake may further cede ground to AMD Ryzen.

Firstly, we get to know that Intel may actually not launch Rocket Lake later this year as was originally speculated. A roadmap from a recent virtual Intel Partner Connect event on how to win over PC enthusiasts was spotted recently by Tom's Hardware. According to this roadmap, there may not be any new HEDT products this year and all that Intel will offer is the 18-core 36-thread Cascade Lake-X Core i9-10980XE. This means that we will have to wait till 2021 to witness the 24-core Ice Lake-SP for HEDT in action. 

The slide also shows only 10th gen SKUs listed for 2020, which means we may not get to see Rocket Lake-S this year as well. This is to be expected as launching Rocket Lake within a few months of Comet Lake would essentially render the latter outdated. 

Although Rocket Lake is still based on the 14nm process, it is actually a backport of 10nm Willow Cove architecture used in Tiger Lake. Therefore, Rocket Lake-S will top-out at a maximum of just eight cores compared to Comet Lake's 10. However, Rocket Lake could bring in significant IPC improvements that may somewhat offset the lesser core count. It is being touted that Intel may make architectural adjustments such as going back to the conventional SVID VRMs and lesser Gen12 Xe EUs in the iGPU to accommodate the "larger" CPU cores.

A SiSoftware entry discovered by leaker @TUM_APISAK shows the Gen12 Mobile Graphics in Rocket Lake to have 32 execution units (EUs). The low EU count seems to be somewhat hinder the Gen12 Xe's early Fire Strike and Time Spy scores, which @_rogame managed to unearth recently.

In Fire Strike, the Gen12 Xe in Rocket Lake scores 1,895 points in Graphics, 18,898 in Physics, and a total score of 1,746. Though these are still preliminary numbers, they aren't much higher than what we have already seen with the UHD Graphics G1 in Ice Lake. Gen12 Xe in Rocket Lake seems to offer about a 7.4% improvement in Fire Strike Graphics and an overall Fire Strike score increase of just about 4%.

In Time Spy, the we get to see Rocket Lake-S scoring 524 points in Graphics, 4,963 points in CPU, and a total score of 605. This is about 10% higher than Time Spy scores posted by Ice Lake's 32 EU UHD Graphics G1. 

It is still unclear how Intel actually wants to position Rocket Lake-S. Despite the purported IPC improvements, mainstream desktop users will want to have more cores to speed up their daily workflow. By restricting the number of EUs to just 32, it looks like Intel is pushing users to opt for dGPUs for those who need a lot more graphics prowess. In any case, AMD will be ready with Ryzen 4000 Zen 3 Vermeer offerings that offer a more efficient process, higher clocks and possibly more cores than current Ryzen 3000 offerings.  

Intel 2020 enthusiast roadmap. (Image Source: Intel via Tom's Hardware)
Intel 2020 enthusiast roadmap. (Image Source: Intel via Tom's Hardware)
Intel Rocket Lake-S 3DMark Fire Strike score. (Image Source: @_rogame on Twitter)
Intel Rocket Lake-S 3DMark Fire Strike score. (Image Source: @_rogame on Twitter)
Intel Rocket Lake-S 3DMark Time Spy score. (Image Source: @_rogame on Twitter)
Intel Rocket Lake-S 3DMark Time Spy score. (Image Source: @_rogame on Twitter)
 

Source(s)

SiSoftware via @TUM_APISAK on Twitter

@_rogame on Twitter (1) and (2)

Tom's Hardware

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 06 > Intel Rocket Lake-S will top-out at eight cores max and may not launch in 2020; Early Gen12 Xe scores indicate a 10% higher performance for the Willow Cove backport compared to Ice Lake 32 EU
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2020-06- 8 (Update: 2020-06- 8)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.