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Huawei launches GX8 successor in China

Huawei launches GX8 successor in China
Huawei launches GX8 successor in China
Known locally as the Maimang 5, this 5.5-inch mid-range smartphone will likely launch elsewhere as the G9 or GX9.

Unlike most smartphones from Huawei, the Maimang 5 is launching in China with a Qualcomm SoC instead of a solution from its own HiSilicon series. Based on its design and specifications, however, the device will likely have a name change to the more recognizable G9 or GX9 when it launches outside of Asian borders.

Core hardware features include:

  • 5.5-inch FHD display
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 625 SoC
  • 3 GB/4 GB RAM
  • 32 GB/64 GB eMMC w/ MicroSD support
  • 3340 mAh battery
  • 16 MP Sony IMX298 f/2.0 rear camera w/ OIS and PDAF, dual-tone Flash, and 4K recording at 30 FPS
  • 8 MP front-facing f/2.0 camera
  • USB Type-C
  • Android 6.0 Marshmallow ww/ EMUI 4.1 interface
  • 7.3 mm thickness

The smartphone will feature a metal chassis and a rear fingerprint sensor below the camera. The retailer listing makes no mention of supported LTE bands and WLAN appears to be single-band only, but this is a device we can't imagine without 4G compatibility.

Prices start at 2400 Yuan (320 Euros) for the 3 GB RAM/32 GB eMMC version and 2600 Yuan (350 Euros) for the 4 GB RAM/64 GB eMMC version. The device is expected to launch in Europe by this September.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 07 > Huawei launches GX8 successor in China
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-07-20 (Update: 2016-07-20)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.