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Windows 10 Mobile to support Snapdragon 625 and 830 SoCs

Windows 10 Mobile to support Snapdragon 625 and 830 SoCs
Windows 10 Mobile to support Snapdragon 625 and 830 SoCs
The recent Windows 10 Mobile Redstone update hints at unannounced Snapdragon SoC.

While Qualcomm has yet to officially announce the Snapdragon 830 MSM8998, the Snapdragon 625 MSM8953 has been available since February of this year. Nonetheless, the rumor mill seems fairly certain that the US chipmaker will soon announce the Snapdragon 830 SoC with Windows 10 Mobile as one of the supported pieces of software. The latest Windows 10 Mobile build directly references support for the MSM8998 and MSM8953.

Other referenced Snapdragon SoCs include the MSM8996 (Snapdragon 820), MSM8994 (Snapdragon 810), MSM8992 (Snapdragon 808), MSM8952 (Snapdragon 617), MSM8909 (Snapdragon 210) and MSM8208 (Snapdragon 208). The existing Lumia 950 and 950 XL flagships are equipped with hexa-core and octa-core Snapdragon 808 and 810 SoCs, respectively, as detailed in our reviews.

The Snapdragon 830 will supposedly be manufactured in a 10 nm production process with support for up to a theoretical 8 GB of RAM. The Snapdragon 810 faced overheating and subsequent PR issues after its launch and the Snapdragon 820 successor reduced the number of cores to keep heat output in check. The manufacturer announced "Cryo" cores following the overheating and throttling reports of its Snapdragon 810 flagship.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 04 > Windows 10 Mobile to support Snapdragon 625 and 830 SoCs
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-04-21 (Update: 2016-04-21)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.