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Windows 10 free upgrade ending this July

Windows 10 free upgrade ending this July
Windows 10 free upgrade ending this July
Starting on July 30th, Microsoft's latest Windows operating system will cost users at least $119.

Microsoft has revealed via a blog post that the final day for free upgrades to Windows 10 will be on July 29th. Users may recall that Microsoft promised the first year of Windows 10 (build 1151) to be free for existing users running authentic versions of Windows 7 or Windows 8/8.1.

Windows 10 Home Edition to cost $119 USD 

It was unclear how Microsoft would handle users who may choose not to upgrade at all, but the company has now clarified that these users can still purchase the retail version for just under $120 USD (or 135 Euros). Windows 7 continues to be the most widely used operating system according to multiple research institutions at around 40 to 48 percent of the market. Though Windows 10 has certainly been picking up steam, it is still far behind at 14 to 20 percent. Microsoft is quick to point out that about 300 million devices are already running Windows 10.

Major Windows 10 update coming in July

The end of the free upgrade will also see the next major update for the latest Windows operating system. Its first birthday will include further improvements and new features such as Microsoft Ink. Currently, Microsoft is testing the new features in Preview builds before the public release. The video below shows Bryan Roper from the Microsoft team on why users should upgrade while they can.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 05 > Windows 10 free upgrade ending this July
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-05- 9 (Update: 2016-05-10)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.