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Google's new US$649 Pixelbook Go is a seemingly budget offering, but only if you consider the entry-level model

The entry-level Google Pixelbook Go is now much more affordable. (Source: Google)
The entry-level Google Pixelbook Go is now much more affordable. (Source: Google)
Google has unveiled the Pixelbook Go at the company's Made by Google event today. The Pixelbook Go offers a choice of 8th gen Intel processors, FHD and UHD touch display options, and is very portable. However, Google does seem to have cut some corners to bring down the price.

Google has exited the tablet business with the discontinuation of the Pixel Slate, but the Pixelbook lineup is still intact. At the Made by Google event today, the Mountain View-giant unveiled the Pixelbook Go with spec improvements over the 2017 Pixelbook at a lower starting price. 

Google is putting the aesthetics of the Pixelbook Go first and foremost. This Chromebook is just 13 mm thin and weighs just close to a kilogram. The overall design is a matte finish with a textured bottom and a magnesium casing. The Pixelbook Go features a 13.3-inch touchscreen that is available in both FHD and 4K 'Molecular Display' options. Unfortunately, it is still a 16:9 display and not a 3:2 one as we would have liked it to be. 

Under the hood, you get the choice of an 8th generation Intel Core m3, Core i5, or Core i7 processor, up to 16 GB RAM, and up to 256 GB SSD (no microSD expansion). The Pixelbook Go features a backlit 'Hush Key' keyboard that offers an even quieter typing experience compared to the original Pixelbook. You get a pair of USB Type-C ports — one on each side — that support fast-charging. Google says the Pixelbook Go can be topped up in just 20 minutes for up to two hours of use. A headphone jack is also available along with an improved Bluetooth radio and dual-band Wi-Fi.

Since this is a 'low-cost' Chromebook, there are no niceties such as a fingerprint reader or face unlock. However, you can use your existing Android phone's biometrics to unlock the Pixelbook Go. There's a FHD webcam that can record 60 fps video as well. A Titan C security chip helps keep data safe. 

Pre-orders for the Pixelbook Go are live now for those in the US and Canada. UK customers will have to wait till January. Pricing information is as follows:

  • Core m3, FHD, 8 GB RAM, 64 GB SSD — US$649
  • Core i5, FHD, 8 GB RAM, 128 GB SSD — US$849
  • Core i5, FHD, 16 GB RAM,128 GB SSD — US$999
  • Core i7, UHD, 16 GB RAM, 256 GB SSD — US$1,399

If you prefer the simplicity and ease of use of ChromeOS, do most of your work online, and are already invested into the Google ecosystem, the Pixelbook Go can complement your workflow pretty well. The base price is reasonable, but the higher tiers seem to be fairly expensive for the specs on offer. We hope to review this device soon so, stay tuned. (Google Pixelbook on sale now at Amazon)

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The Pixelbook Go features a 'Hush Key' keyboard for a quiet typing experience. (Source: Google)
The Pixelbook Go features a 'Hush Key' keyboard for a quiet typing experience. (Source: Google)

Source(s)

Made by Google 2019 Event

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 10 > Google's new US$649 Pixelbook Go is a seemingly budget offering, but only if you consider the entry-level model
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2019-10-15 (Update: 2019-10-17)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.