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Computex 2016 | Gigabyte Aero 14 gaming notebook now official

Gigabyte Aero 14 gaming notebook now official
Gigabyte Aero 14 gaming notebook now official
The 19.9 mm thick 14-inch gaming notebook will carry a tremendously dense 94 Wh battery for up to a 10-hour battery life.

Retailers may have already leaked the Aero 14 a day early, but Gigabyte has now detailed its newest 14-inch gaming notebook designed to compete directly against the likes of the Razer Blade 14 and MSI GS40. Based on its design and size, the Aero 14 looks to be a successor to the aging Gigabyte P34 series as well.

Core specifications of the model can be found on our previous report. The official press release, however, states NVMe, three color choices, and a thickness of just 19.9 mm compared to 20.9 mm of the P34 series. Two M.2 storage slots will reportedly be available, though it is unlikely that RAID will be supported in order to better differentiate the Gigabyte gaming notebooks from the higher-end and pricier Aorus series. Nonetheless, the Aero 14 sports a column of Macro keys not unlike its Aorus counterparts.

Perhaps the most interesting hardware specification is its large 94.24 Wh battery for up to a claimed 10-hour runtime. Even most 15- and 17-inch notebooks carry lower capacity batteries than the Aero 14 including the hefty 8-pound Alienware 17 R3, so this will definitely be a major selling point for Gigabyte.

No word yet on launch dates or prices, but we will likely have more info come Computex 2016 for a better hands-on test at the Gigabyte exhibit.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 05 > Gigabyte Aero 14 gaming notebook now official
Allen Ngo, 2016-05-27 (Update: 2016-05-27)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.