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Expensive Windows 7 support: In 2022, Microsoft will charge US$200

Windows 7 will bring in revenue for security updates starting in 2020
Windows 7 will bring in revenue for security updates starting in 2020
Windows 7 is far from dead; with around a third of the market share, the operating system is primarily used by businesses. Official support will end next year, but can be extended for another three years – at a price.
Daniel Puschina,

Official support for Windows 7, including safety updates, will end on January 14, 2020. Many companies, however, are still using the 10-year-old operating system, and will not be able to upgrade to Windows 10 in the next eleven months. Not only is the conversion of an operating system no easy task, some companies or authorities working with special software have no other choice than Windows 7 due to compatibility issues.

For these companies, however, Microsoft has a solution, though it has associated costs. They are prepared to continue to provide Windows 7 with the program “Extended Security Updates,” through 2023. After all, according to Statcounter, Windows 7 still has a remarkable 35% of the market share. Starting in January 2020, Microsoft will charge US$50 per PC for this extended support, and that will double to US$100 in the following year. From 2022 to 2023 the price will once again be doubled, to US$200 per computer.

Major customers with dozens of PCs will most likely receive a discount, but that will not work if any years are skipped. Whoever wants security updates in 2022 will have to pay for the years before as well.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 02 > Expensive Windows 7 support: In 2022, Microsoft will charge US$200
Daniel Puschina, 2019-02- 7 (Update: 2019-02- 7)
Daniel Puschina
Daniel Puschina - Editor
I am the generation who made the first computer experiences in the 90s on a 386 with the 20MHz turbo key. It was a tightrope walk between the performance limit of my computer and the scarce pocket money, but the motivation to get the last bit of performance out of it was all the greater. With 2MB of RAM, squeezing a single kilobyte out of the config.sys file was absolutely decisive for "Game starts" or "Game does not start". From this point on I also started to get more and more involved with benchmark tests, performance comparisons and tuning of components on the hardware side, which made me a permanent visitor to the Notebookcheck site in the last years. So it's a great pleasure for me to be able to write and test actively for this site myself.