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Apple may be switching to Intel for new iPhone wireless modules

Apple may be switching to Intel for new iPhone wireless modules
Apple may be switching to Intel for new iPhone wireless modules
Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf recently hinted at losing a major customer to a competitor in a recent earnings call.

So far, wireless and LTE-enabled modems as found in iPads and iPhones have been provided by Qualcomm while some SoC designs have been produced by Samsung and TSMC. Late last year, however, rumblings were heard about Apple partnering with Intel for future wireless hardware needs instead. The move would be a boon for Intel as the company recently posted quarterly losses accompanied by an announcement of significant layoffs.

In a recent quarterly financial presentation with investors and analysts, Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf hinted that one of its largest customers may soon be changing suppliers. The vague description could be alluding to new contracts between Apple and Intel for the aforementioned wireless modules and, according to Bloomberg, is very likely what Mollenkopf is referring to. NYSE had reacted to the news with Qualcomm shares falling 2.5 percent, but recovered shortly by the end of the week at 52.64 USD. Mollenkopf attempted to calm shareholders by reassuring that the loss of a major customer will have no impact on profit levels at least for the near term.

The recently released Snapdragon 820 flagship is powering new high-end Android smartphones of 2016 including the LG G5, HTC 10, Galaxy S7, and HP Elite x3.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 04 > Apple may be switching to Intel for new iPhone wireless modules
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-04-25 (Update: 2016-04-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.