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LG G5 is easily repairable according to iFixit teardown

LG G5 is easily repairable according to iFixit teardown
LG G5 is easily repairable according to iFixit teardown
The G5 certainly doesn't grab as many headlines as Apple or Samsung or its rising Chinese competitors, but iFixit has recently ranked it one of the best in terms of serviceability.

The LG G5 is the current flagship smartphone for the South Korean manufacturer. Unlike its immediate competitors like the iPhone 6s or Galaxy S7, the G5 has modular features that subsequently make it one of the most easily repairable flagship smartphones from a major manufacturer.

Easy serviceability

The latest teardown from iFixit has ranked the G5 an 8 out of 10 in how repairable the smartphone can be. Its final score is similar to the G4 where its predecessor also scored an 8 for serviceability. The source praises the removable 2800 mAh battery pack and improved camera controls as well.

Modular makeup: Plastic front cover, aluminum bottom

While the LG G series has been criticized for its use of plastic compared to some of its competitors, the G5 does indeed utilize some aluminum outside of the plastic "Magic Slot" near the front cover. These surfaces are also thick and glued together, which iFixit has deducted points on from the final serviceability score. Overall, however, the source finds the smartphone quite easy to repair.

Though the G5 only recently launched, the manufacturer has expressed enthusiasm on launch day sales of the device. Expect our full review on the device in the coming weeks.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 04 > LG G5 is easily repairable according to iFixit teardown
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-04- 7 (Update: 2016-04- 7)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.