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Intel claims Apollo Lake will be 30 percent faster than Braswell

Intel claims Apollo Lake will be 30 percent faster than Braswell
Intel claims Apollo Lake will be 30 percent faster than Braswell
The 14 nm Apollo Lake platform should be coming this Fall with faster performance and 15 percent longer battery life.

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While the successor to the Intel Atom Braswell platform was announced in April, rough performance expectations were unknown at the time. Now, Intel has unveiled some rough data at this year's Computex that correspond with leaks published by Anandtech. We can expect a 30 percent increase in both CPU and GPU performance in addition to a 15 percent rise in battery life according to the chipmaker.

The official slides below also show that Apollo Lake will support USB Type-C, DDR3L, and both LPDDR3 and LPDDR4. Linux and 64-bit Windows 10 support will be supported via the Pentium and Celeron N/J branding.

Apollo Lake will be manufactured in 14 nm under the Goldmont architecture that borrows heavily from the current Skylake generation of Core ix processors. Intel will be implementing the power-efficient processors in inexpensive Cloudbooks, 2-in-1 netbooks, small PCs, IP cameras, and even in automobiles. Shipments of Apollo SoCs are expected to begin this Fall.

Quelle(n)

http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?p=38266381#post38266381

via: http://liliputing.com/2016/06/intel-apollo-lake-chips-offer-30-percent-performance-boost-braswell.html

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 06 > Intel claims Apollo Lake will be 30 percent faster than Braswell
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-06- 7 (Update: 2016-06- 7)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.