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Apple M1X, M2, A14X, A15, and A15 Bionic lead the speculation for the true identities of four alleged upcoming Apple SoCs

A 2021 MacBook Pro could sport a 12-core or even 16-core Apple M1X SoC. (Image source: MacRumors/MattTalksTech - edited)
A 2021 MacBook Pro could sport a 12-core or even 16-core Apple M1X SoC. (Image source: MacRumors/MattTalksTech - edited)
A tech tipster has claimed that Apple is preparing four new SoCs and has shared the alleged internal identifiers for the processors. Unsurprisingly, this has led to considerable speculation about their eventual product names, with Apple M1X, M2, A14X, A15, and A15 Bionic heading the suggestions. 2021’s 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pro models could feature a new SoC.

Leaker @never_released has posted the internal identifiers for four alleged Apple SoCs: T6000 and T6001 in the T600x series; T8110 and T8112 in the T811x series. This has created a flurry of excitement about what they could be, although a good pinch of salt has to be at hand here, and there are some discrepancies that need to be pointed out before we start expecting a 32-core iMac or 16-core MacBook Pro to land in stores within the next few months. But the evidence certainly seems to indicate at least two new Apple processors are incoming.

In various sources, there have been suggestions that the above identifiers could end up being an Apple M1X, M2, A14X, A15, or A15 Bionic. The M1X certainly seems like a reasonable bet, with the Apple M1 having the internal code T8103, and you can be sure Apple will want to build on the momentum already created by the successful release of the ARM-based M1. A 12-core part has already been rumored, and there have been mentions of Cupertino-designed processors being tested with 32 CPU cores and even up to 128 GPU cores. So there is certainly plenty of chatter to suggest that the M1X…or M2…could come in a 12-core or 16-core variety ready for the expected 2021 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pro laptops.

Interestingly enough though, the similarly titled T8101 ended up being the Apple A14 Bionic, which can be found in devices such as the iPhone 12. This is why there have been suggestions of the potential product names A14X, A15, or A15 Bionic (the latter seems more likely if Apple follows its current naming scheme) as being the true identities of the aforementioned identifiers. A new iPad Pro, the 2021 iPhone series – there are a few Apple devices that could turn up later this year brandishing a novel A-series processor. But there are some further details that still need to be considered.

For instance, @never_released has informed us about the T6000 and T6001 before, back in July 2020. These could eventually end up in MacBooks…or even in the redesigned desktop iMac devices that are expected this year. But these mystery SoCs might just stay in Apple’s testing labs too. Also, the source has been noted for being quite accurate but did incorrectly state that the T8103 was going to be the Apple A14X, which then seemed to be the A14X Bionic for a while, before it finally saw the light of day as the Apple M1. The take away here? You could safely bet that Apple has at least two processors to amaze us with this year, if not four. There are rumors that there will be an Apple event in March, so we should soon find out more details about these intriguing identifiers.

Buy the Apple MacBook Air with M1 chip on Amazon

Source(s)

@never_released (1/2) & KitGuru & MySmartPrice & Tom's Hardware & SaranByte (YouTube) & MacRumors (1/2)

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2021 02 > Apple M1X, M2, A14X, A15, and A15 Bionic lead the speculation for the true identities of four alleged upcoming Apple SoCs
Daniel R Deakin, 2021-02- 6 (Update: 2021-02- 6)
Daniel R Deakin
Daniel R Deakin - Managing News Editor - 2191 articles published on Notebookcheck since 2012
My interest in technology began after I was presented with an Atari 800XL home computer in the mid-1980s. I especially enjoy writing about technological advances, compelling rumors, and intriguing tech-related leaks. I have a degree in International Relations and Strategic Studies and count my family, reading, writing, and travel as the main passions of my life. I have been with Notebookcheck since 2012.