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Amazon Fire tablet now available for just $40 USD

Amazon Fire tablet now available for just $40 USD
Amazon Fire tablet now available for just $40 USD
The 7-inch tablet gets a 20 percent price cut to become one of the most affordable Fire devices yet.

Customers in North America can now purchase the 7-inch Amazon fire for $10 off the already inexpensive retail price of $50. This is compared to most parts of Europe where the cheapest offering is still in the 60 Euro range. It's worth noting that the new $40 price tag applies to the model with "Special Offers" only, so advertisements will pop as wallpapers every time the display is powered on. The standard edition with no advertisements retails for $55.

The tablet is largely a slimmer redesign of the original $200 Fire tablet that launched nearly half a decade ago with almost identical core specifications including the 1024 x 600 resolution display, 802.11 b/g/n wireless, and 8 GB of internal storage. RAM, however, has been doubled to 1 GB and with a lighter final weight of 313 g compared to 413 g of the original.

Amazon made available its latest generation of Fire devices in September 2015 that includes 6-inch models all the way to 10.1-inch models. The series is characterized by its excellent prices with relatively powerful core hardware. Android purists, however, will lament the fact that the Fire tablets run on Amazon's Fire OS instead. Thus, users are limited to Amazon's smaller Appstore as opposed to the more developed Google Play store. Access to Google services will require additional tricks and changes to settings.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 02 > Amazon Fire tablet now available for just $40 USD
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-02- 9 (Update: 2016-02- 9)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.