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Alcatel One Touch Idol 4 could ship with Snapdragon 652

Alcatel One Touch Idol 4 could ship with Snapdragon 652
Alcatel One Touch Idol 4 could ship with Snapdragon 652
Other features include a 5.5-inch Full HD display, 3 GB RAM, and 16 GB of internal memory.

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A new entry in the GFXBench database has revealed a few key specifications on the upcoming Alcatel One Touch Idol 4 smartphone. According to the source, the device will carry the following:

  • 5.5-inch 1080p display
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 652 SoC
  • Adreno 510 GPU
  • 3 GB RAM
  • 16 GB eMMC
  • 16 MP rear + 8 MP front cameras

The inclusion of the Snapdragon 652 chip is perhaps the more notable feature as it was only recently renamed from the previous Snapdragon 620. The Snapdragon 618 was also renamed to the 650 to further delineate it from the current Snapdragon 615, 616, and 617.

GFXBench places the Snapdragon 652 above the LG G Flex 2, HTC One M9, and Sony Xperia Z3+, all of which carry the high-end Snapdragon 810 SoC. The Snapdragon 652 is also not expected to suffer from any throttling or overheating issues common on smartphones with the 810 series of SoCs. Overall performance will likely be higher than the Snapdragon 615 and Adreno 405 in the previous One Touch Idol 3.

Alcatel has yet to officially announce the One Touch Idol 4 or any pricing information on the smartphone.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 12 > Alcatel One Touch Idol 4 could ship with Snapdragon 652
Andreas Müller/ Allen Ngo, 2015-12-23 (Update: 2015-12-23)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.