Notebookcheck

AMD's upcoming Zen 3-based EPYC Milan server CPUs may offer 20% bump in performance over Zen 2 EPYC Rome

AMD EPYC Milan server CPUs may be noticeably faster than the current EPYC Rome CPUs. (Image via AMD)
AMD EPYC Milan server CPUs may be noticeably faster than the current EPYC Rome CPUs. (Image via AMD)
According to OEM slides obtained by German website HardwareLUXX, AMD's upcoming Zen 3-based EPYC Milan server CPUs will offer up to a 20% increase over the current Zen 2-based EPYC Rome CPUs. Milan CPUs may also reorganize the L3 cache on the chip, allowing for all 32 MB of L3 cache to be shared between all cores rather than splitting the L3 cache into two 16 MB segments.

AMD promised the release of Zen 3 CPUs by the end of the year, and with the new architecture will come an inevitable increase in performance. But how much will Zen 3 improve on Zen 2? According to the team at the German site HardwareLUXX, Zen 3 server CPUs may be up to 20% more powerful than those built on Zen 2.

This information comes from slides obtained by HardwareLUXX from an OEM insider. The slides, which were not published, claim that AMD’s EPYC Milan server CPUs, which will be built on the Zen 3 architecture, will offer a 20% bump in overall performance over the current EPYC Rome CPUs built on Zen 2.

That 20% increase will be on the 32 core/64 thread Milan CPUs, according to the slides, though other configurations will also be noticeably better. The 64 core/128 thread CPUs will likely see improvements in the 10-15% range, mainly because AMD can hit higher clocks on lower core count chips.

The source also claims that Milan will offer a 15% increase in instructions per clock (IPC) performance for integer calculations.

Zen 3 is looking like an incremental improvement over Zen 2 rather than a radical manufacturing shift. Zen 3 will still be built on a 7 nm process, which AMD previously labeled as 7 nm+.

According to the slides, Zen 3 will shift the arrangement of the Zen 2’s architecture, altering how the Core Compute Die (CCD) and Core Compute Complex (CCX) are structured on the chip.

The slides claim that Zen 3 will have a 32 MB L3 cache shared between all cores. Currently, Zen 2 splits its 32 MB L3 cache into two smaller 16 MB segments.

As with all rumors, take this information with a grain of salt. However, we’ll know how much of an improvement Zen 3 EPYC CPUs offer when they are released later this year.

Source(s)

Read all 1 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 08 > AMD's upcoming Zen 3-based EPYC Milan server CPUs may offer 20% bump in performance over Zen 2 EPYC Rome
Sam Medley, 2020-08-27 (Update: 2020-08-27)
Sam Medley
Sam Medley - Review Editor - @samuel_medley
I've been a "tech-head" my entire life. After graduating college with a degree in Mathematics, I worked in finance and banking a few years before taking a job as a Systems Analyst for my local school district. I started working with Notebookcheck in October of 2016 and have enjoyed writing news articles and notebook reviews. My areas of interest include the business side of technology, retro gaming, Linux, and innovative gadgets. When I'm not hunched over an electronic device or writing code for a new database, I'm either outside with my family, playing a decade-old video game, or sitting behind a drum set.