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AMD EPYC Milan engineering sample spotted in the wild: 7nm+ Zen 3 ES runs at up to 2.2 GHz, matching EPYC Rome ES speeds

The EPYC Milan ES ran at up to 2.2 GHz (Image source: AMD)
The EPYC Milan ES ran at up to 2.2 GHz (Image source: AMD)
Tipster @Execufix spotted a reference to AMD’s upcoming EPYC Milan server lineup. An unspecified EPYC Milan server chip was found to operate with a base frequency of 1.5 GHz and a boost clock of 2.2 GHz, in line with ES clocks for EPYC Rome parts. If EPYC Milan hits these clocks in its final avatar, it should provide a noticeable performance boost versus EPYC Rome parts.
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With AMD's Zen 3 powered consumer Ryzen 4000 desktop parts just months away, new details have now emerged about EPYC Milan, the Zen 3-based server lineup set to replace EPYC Rome and to take on Intel's Xeon Gold and Xeon Platinum offerings.

Tipster @Execufix spotted some EPYC Milan processor details. The engineering sample that he's looking at is clocked at a low 2.2 GHz boost clock with a 1.5 GHz base clock. This is to be expected since ES parts frequently run at lower clockspeeds than the final design.

The details @Execufix managed to obtain don't include insight into EPYC Milan core counts or cache size. Going by the pattern set by EPYC Rome, we should see parts with up to 64 cores per socket, meaning dual socket designs with as many as 128 CPU cores.

The IPC uplift that Zen 3 brings means that EPYC Milan parts will offer notable performance increases, even if I clock speeds are kept low. The use of an enhanced 7nm process node gives AMD a measure of leeway with temps, power draw, and clockspeed - we expect the final EPYC Milan designs to deliver substantially higher performance.

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Arjun Krishna Lal
Arjun Krishna Lal - Tech Writer - 474 articles published on Notebookcheck since 2019
I've had a passion for PC gaming since 1996, when I watched my dad score frags in Quake as a 1 year-old. I've gone on to become a Penguin-published author and tech journalist. Apart from working as an editor at Notebookcheck, I write for outlets including TechSpot and Gamingbolt. I’m the Director of Content at Flying V Group, one of the top 5 digital marketing agencies in Orange County. When I'm not traveling the world, gathering stories for my next book, you can find me tinkering with my PC.
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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 07 > AMD EPYC Milan engineering sample spotted in the wild: 7nm+ Zen 3 ES runs at up to 2.2 GHz, matching EPYC Rome ES speeds
Arjun Krishna Lal, 2020-07- 6 (Update: 2020-07- 6)