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"A masterclass in repairability": iFixit tears down the 2019 Mac Pro

iFixit's Mac Pro teardown: (Image source: iFixit)
iFixit's Mac Pro teardown: (Image source: iFixit)
iFixit recently took on the new Mac Pro and rated it 9 out of 10 for repairability. A “Fixmas miracle,” the 2019 model is far easier to repair than older “trashcan” Macs. Together with the new public repair manuals, servicing is more user-friendly than ever.
Arjun Krishna Lal,

The 2019 Mac Pro released on 10th December, and it didn't take long for iFixit to perform a teardown. The new Mac ditches the old "trashcan" design, in favor of a more conventional look, making it substantially easier to repair.

iFixit goes on to call the new Mac Pro a "Fixmas miracle," describing it as "beautiful, amazingly well put together, and a masterclass in repairability." Previous Macs were notorious for being tough to repair and upgrade.

Upgrading storage was a key problem many Mac users face. An attached T2 security chip makes the included modular SSD non-replaceable. Thankfully, multiple PCI-e slots with easy access mean that users can just slot in additional storage when needed.

Apple's free public repair manual is a step forward, too, as is the use of industry-standard sockets and interfaces. The mostly modular design means that user upgrades and replacements won't be a nightmare anymore. One caveat, though: it'll cost you a small fortune to repair or replace parts not on Apple's (very) limited list of approved repairs.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 12 > "A masterclass in repairability": iFixit tears down the 2019 Mac Pro
Arjun Krishna Lal, 2019-12-23 (Update: 2019-12-26)
Arjun Krishna Lal
Arjun Krishna Lal - News Editor
I've had a passion for PC gaming since 1996, when I watched my dad score frags in Quake as a 1 year-old. I've gone on to become a Penguin-published author and tech journalist. When I'm not traveling the world, gathering stories for my next book, you can find me tinkering with my PC.