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Review HP Envy 6-1000sg Ultrabook

Till Schönborn (translated by Till), 09/12/2012

More than just an Ultrabook? Most Ultrabook buyers have to sacrifice performance in favor of enhanced mobility. HP's Envy 6 bucks the trend, and aims to woo gamers with a dedicated graphics card, all while delivering good value for money. Unfortunately, the slim 15-inch model isn't much use outdoors.

While the first generation of Ultrabooks almost exclusively fell into the compact 13-inch category, we've recently witnessed the introduction of more and more models with larger screens. Many of these try to make up for the slight loss of portability with a longer features list and the performance gains that can be achieved with a dedicated graphics card.

The Envy 6-1000g is HP's first attempt in this area of the market, after previously releasing smaller models, such as the Folio 13 or the Envy 14 Spectre. Like all Ultrabooks, the Envy 6 is equipped with an Intel ULV processor, and the choice has come down to the Core i5-3317U, which hails from the latest Ivy Bridge generation. Also part of the package is a dedicated AMD Radeon HD 7670M graphics card, which should find the approval of gamers. The relatively modest price tag of less than 800 Euros (~$1034) forces some compromise in the memory department: 4 GB of RAM are at the lower end, and a 320 GB hard disk (albeit with the help of a 32 GB SSD cache) is average at best.

Thanks to the integrated 4-cell battery, HP promises a battery life of up to 8 hours. Unfortunately, the only display on offer is a glossy 15.6-inch panel with a 1366x768 pixel resolution, but that's typical for the target price range. Here, the Envy 6 will have to compete with rivals such as the Acer Aspire TimelineU M5-581TG, another gaming capable 15-inch Ultrabook.

Case

flawless workmanship
flawless workmanship

Apart from the slim profile characteristic of Ultrabooks, the Envy 6 immediately impressed us with its beautiful design and excellent materials. While the back of the display and the top of the chassis are finished in black matte aluminum, the red underside offers a stark contrast - just in case you often find yourself looking at the laptop from below. Attention to detail is reflected in the chrome-look framing of the touchpad, adding to the impression of high build quality that even puts some of the pricier Ultrabook competitors to shame. Unfortunately, the case attracts dirt and finger prints all too easily - frequent use of a cleaning cloth is compulsory.

For a 15-inch laptop, the weight of only 2.15 kg (4.7 pounds) is extremely light, underscoring the mobility aspirations of the Envy 6. In addition, the thickness of less than 2 centimeters (0.78 inches) is just 2 mm (0.08 inches) more than the smaller Asus Zenbook UX32VD. With these numbers, one has to ask: did HP take any shortcuts when it comes to stability?

Fortunately, that's not the case: Especially the base unit is very rigid, thanks to a thick aluminum plate. The rubberized bottom covering also proved to be solid enough, despite its simple plastic construction. The display cannot quite keep up and can be visibly flexed. Given that the hinges are very tight, both hands and a bit of care are required to open up the display.

Apart from this minor shortcoming, the Ultrabook has a remarkable touch and feel to it and oozes build quality. Material transitions reveal no sharp edges or uneven spacing. The HP does not quite reach the lofty quality standard of Apple's MacBooks or Dell's XPS series, but in its price range, the build quality is second to none.

Connectivity

An Ultrabook is primarily a travel companion, and neither designed for, nor capable of, replacing a full DTR Notebook. This is reflected in the limited range of connectors, and our test candidate is no exception. At least, we find 3 USB ports, two of which support the fast SuperSpeed standard, aka USB 3.0. In addition, the single USB 2.0 port offers the possibility of charging Smartphones or MP3 players while the notebook itself is switched off.

The rest of the ports on the Envy 6 are standard fare: HDMI, Gigabit Ethernet, a 2-in-1 card reader (SD, MMC) and the obligatory audio sockets - we did not find any particular highlights like a DisplayPort. The user even has to make do without an analog VGA port.

HP has squeezed all connectors near the rear on both sides of the chassis. In some instances, the spacing between them can be a bit too tight, for example, a thick USB stick might block neighboring ports. We also don't particularly like the poor accessibility of the card reader or that of the microphone and headphone jacks, which we would have preferred to have seen nearer to the front.

front: no ports
Front: no ports
lefthand side: GBit-LAN, HDMI, 2x USB 3.0, card reader
lefthand side: GBit-LAN, HDMI, 2x USB 3.0, card reader
rear: no ports
rear: no ports
righthand side: Kensington Lock, microphone, headphone, USB 2.0, power socket
righthand side: Kensington Lock, microphone, headphone, USB 2.0, power socket
1,3-Megapixel-Webcam
1,3-Megapixel-Webcam

Communication

HP has opted for a WLAN card in mini PCIe format made by Broadcom, the 4313GN (1x1) to be precise. This low-end model only transmits in the 2.4 Ghz band, and supports 802.11 b/g/n standards. Neither the range nor the maximum transfer rate (72 MBit/s BRUTTO) left a particularly good impression during our test, and could become a problem when connecting to more distant Wi-Fi hot spots. At least the adapter also supports Bluetooth, but only the older 3.0 + HS (high speed extension) variant. HP does not offer a UMTS (3G) option.

The "TrueVision-HD-Webcam" is integrated in the display frame, and capable of 1.3 Megapixel resolution. Image quality is at best average; neither sharpness nor noise level are particularly convincing. On the upside, the sensor delivers a fluent video stream, even at maximum resolution. The built-in microphone delivers slightly tinny and hollow sounds, only really usable for applications like Skype.

Accessories

The HP Envy 6-1000sg comes shipped with a battery, 65 Watt power adapter, a few brochures and warranty papers included in a slim box. The manufacturer does not provide any additional extras, like recovery or driver media. The preinstalled Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit operating system is mostly free of annoying tool bars or trial versions, but all the useful standard programs like Adobe's Acrobat Reader or Microsoft Office 2010 (starter edition) are on board. In addition, there are a couple of more or less useful manufacturer tools. The HP Security Assistant lets the user manage passwords or create backups; the Connection Manager provides an overview of network connections.

Maintenance

The lack of a service cover makes user serviceability rather cumbersome: A total of nine screws have to be removed from the underside before the case can be carefully jimmied open. After you've cleared this first hurdle, however, most components of the Envy 6 can be replaced with relative ease.

While the 2.5-inch bay and the mSATA slot are already occupied, there's nothing to prevent you from upgrading the RAM. The Wi-Fi module could also be exchanged by the user, although the single antenna means that faster adapters will have limited use.

Warranty

According to a sticker on the bottom, HP offers a two-year manufacturer's warranty. This time span can be extended to a total of three years with an optional upgrade called "Care Pack", for a price of about 120 Euros (~$155), depending on the seller.

Input Devices

Keyboard

HP has equipped the Envy 6 with a generous full-size chiclet-style keyboard, but sadly there is no numbers block. On the upside, the user can take comfort in the 15 x 15 mm (0.6 x 0.6 in.) keys, which facilitate the transition from an ordinary PC keyboard. Neither the manufacturing quality nor the stability leave much to criticize, only a slight flexibility in the middle part tempers the overall convincing picture.

Apart from the fact that the space key got stuck on our test sample, the positive impression carries over to the typing comfort. Key presses require very little effort, with a relatively short key travel followed by a precise and well-defined pressure point. The tactile feedback would be even better with more structured key surfaces and slightly larger spacings between the letters, for which there would be enough room, as the 35 millimeters (1.38 inches) of free space on either side of the keyboard show. Particularly fast typing results in a slight rattling noise of the keys, but that did not really bother us.

Touchpad

Like the keyboard, the touchpad is also inset in the aluminum cover of the base unit by several millimeters, which helps to clearly mark the input surface from the surrounding palm rest. Unfortunately, the slightly glossy finish of the Synaptic pad only works well with perfectly dry hands - sweaty fingers will cause considerable resistance. Multi-touch gestures like pinch-zoom are no problem, thanks to the impressive 11 x 7 centimeter (4.33 x 2.76 inch) dimensions, and can be configured according to user preferences in the driver panel.

The mouse keys are integrated directly into the underside of the touchpad, and require a firm press. Even after a click is registered, the keys can be impressed a further 1 to 2 millimeters (0.04 to 0.08 inches), which does not inspire the highest degree of confidence in the mechanics. This behavior is commonly found on models from other manufacturers as well, that are of a similar design.

Keyboard
Keyboard
Touchpad
Touchpad

Display

Wie wir testen - Display

For several years now, a resolution of 1366x768 pixels has been the norm for entry-level and mid-range notebooks in 15.6-inch format. If you want more than the resultant 100 dpi pixel density, you'll often have to dig much deeper into your pockets.

Even more disappointing than the low resolution, however, is the weak background illumination, which only manages a maximum screen brightness of 158 cd/m². For comparison, some other Ultrabooks like the Asus Zenbook UX31A are more than twice as bright. While this may not be necessary for indoor use, it does come in very handy outdoors - but more on that later.

151
cd/m²
154
cd/m²
151
cd/m²
148
cd/m²
164
cd/m²
165
cd/m²
150
cd/m²
172
cd/m²
168
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
Information
Gossen Mavo-Monitor
Maximum: 172 cd/m²
Average: 158.1 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 86 %
Center on Battery: 164 cd/m²
Black: 0.84 cd/m²
Contrast: 195:1

Our disappointment extends to the other measurements as well. The contrast of 195:1 is just as pale as we've grown used to from many other TN panels. Much of the blame falls on the too high black level of 0.84 cd/m², which can be felt particularly in high contrast movies or games. Dark screen areas appear as if overcast by a gray veil, something our test candidate has in common with most of its competitors.

While not relevant for the majority of potential buyers, we'll also take a look at the display's color range. Unsurprisingly, it neither covers the sRGB nor the AdobeRGB color spaces, which limits the notebook's usability for specialized graphics applications or professional photo editing.

 

Envy 6 vs. AdobeRGB (t)
Envy 6 vs. AdobeRGB (t)
Envy 6 vs. sRGB (t)
Envy 6 vs. sRGB (t)
Envy 6 vs. Envy 14 (t)
Envy 6 vs. Envy 14 (t)
Envy 6 vs. U2442N (t)
Envy 6 vs. U2442N (t)
outdoor use
outdoor use

When a notebook is as mobile as the Envy 6, unlimited outdoor readability is of the essence. Unfortunately, HP falls short on two fronts: In combination with the much too low display brightness, the glossy finish makes images hard to see even outside of direct sunlight. The manufacturer really needs to get its act together here.

 

 

Viewing angles HP Envy 6-1000sg
Viewing angles HP Envy 6-1000sg

Our final discipline, the measurement of viewing angles, is no strong suit of the display either. Typical of TN panels, even a slight variation of seating position results in a noticeable decrease of image quality. The vertical is particularly hard hit, but even in the horizontal, the Envy 6 cannot compete with the (admittedly much more expensive) Zenbook UX32VD.

Performance

2,6 GHz maximum Turbo Boost speed
2,6 GHz maximum Turbo speed

A thin laptop requires a ULV processor in order to officially qualify as an Ultrabook, according to the specifications of Intel, "inventor" of the category. HP has opted for the midrange model Core i5-3317U , a 1.7 GHz dual-core CPU of the current Ivy Bridge generation. Like all Core i5 (and Core i7) processors, the 3317U features Intel's Turbo Boost 2.0 technology, which enables the clock speed to increase in steps of 100 Mhz, up to a maximum of 2.6 Ghz (2.4 Ghz in dual-core mode). Multithreaded software can benefit from Hyperthreading, where each core executes two threads in parallel. In terms of power consumption, the 22nm CPU is quite moderate: like all ULV models, the TDP is specified at only 17 Watts.

While most Ultrabooks have to make do with the HD Graphics 4000 option integrated into the chipset, the Envy 6 comes equipped with an additional dedicated graphics card. After most of the models we've had for review recently featured NVIDIA’s Kepler series, we are surprised to see the choice of the slightly older Radeon HD 7670M. AMD's card also enables dynamic graphics switching (which the manufacturer calls "Dynamic Switchable Graphics" or "Enduro") comparable to Optimus, so that no power goes to waste in idle mode.

The RAM is specified at a minimal 4 GB (1 module of DDR3-1600 made by Hynix), and the 320 GB hard disk is also a common choice for entry level notebooks. At least, HP also provides a 32 GB SSD cache, which should increase responsiveness.

Systeminfo CPUZ CPU
Systeminfo CPUZ Cache
Systeminfo CPUZ Mainboard
Systeminfo CPUZ RAM
Systeminfo CPUZ RAM SPD
Systeminfo GPU-Z
Systeminfo HWInfo
DPC Latenzen
System information HP Envy 6-1000sg

Processor

Since we already know the Core i5-3317U from a number of other Ultrabooks, the CPU performance of the model under review is easy to evaluate. The deciding factor now becomes whether the CPU can make full use of the turbo frequencies - and that's the case on the Envy 6, both plugged in and on battery power. The Cinebench R11.5 score of 2.39 points is just as good as the results of the single-thread mode of the Cinebench R10, which come in at 4267 points (all in 64-bit mode). You will find many more benchmark results in the corresponding page of our CPU database.

Compared to ordinary 35 Watt models like the Core i5-3210M, the ULV CPU trails by only 20%, hardly noticeable in practice. For most applications and games that's more than enough power, only the most demanding software like HD video editing and advanced graphics processing will on occasion make you wish for a quad-core chip. Needless to say that such a level of performance would be hard to combine with the portability and stamina of a lightweight Ultrabook.

Cinebench R10 Rendering Single 32Bit
3451
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 32Bit
7452
Cinebench R10 Shading 32Bit
6509
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single CPUs 64Bit
4268 Points
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 64Bit
9067 Points
Cinebench R10 Shading 64Bit
6566 Points
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Single 64Bit
1.04 Points
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
2.39 Points
Cinebench R11.5 OpenGL 64Bit
33.15 fps
Help

Storage

HD Tune
HD Tune
CrystalDiskMark
CrystalDiskMark

More and more manufacturers go for a combination of a classic HD and a fast SSD cache - not surprisingly, since it offers a well-balanced compromise of capacity and performance at an attractive price point.

From the point of view of the user, this RAID configuration works completely seamlessly. The most frequently used data is automatically stored on the SSD, and in an ideal case, the much larger access time of the hard disk never becomes an issue.

Inside the Envy 6, we find a Hitachi HDD (HTS545032A7E380, 320 GB), as well as an mSATA drive made by Samsung (PM 830, 32 GB). While the hard disk isn't a particularly fast one, with 8 GB of cache and spinning at 5400 RPM, the performance of Samsung's current SSD generation had already impressed us in several previous tests.

At least according to our benchmarks, HD Tune and CrystalDiskMark, however, the combination does not seem to work together that well. The average sequential transfer rate of about 55 MB/s is even lower than what the HDD should be capable of on its own. For small 4K files, we were able to witness much better results, in line with our expectations for flash memory.

Hitachi HTS545032A7E380 + 32 GByte Samsung SSD 830
Transfer Rate Minimum: 25.2 MB/s
Transfer Rate Maximum: 169.4 MB/s
Transfer Rate Average: 54.9 MB/s
Access Time: 17.1 ms
Burst Rate: 162.9 MB/s
CPU Usage: 1 %

System Performance

The fact that the SSD cache is still worthwhile becomes apparent in the system performance benchmarks of the PCMark series. Here, scores of 7436 points in PCMark Vantage and 3528 points in PCMark 7 place the Envy 6 right in between notebooks with only mechanical hard disks, and those with full SSD drives.

Several days of real-life tests have left us with a similar impression. At just 25 seconds, the startup process is completed noticeably quicker than on comparable notebooks that don't benefit from the additional cache. Frequently used programs like the web browser start almost instantly. Naturally, larger data sets that don't fit inside the SSD do not show any signs of improvement.

4.9
Windows 7 Experience Index
Processor
Calculations per second
6.9
Memory (RAM)
Memory operations per second
5.9
Graphics
Desktop performance for Windows Aero
4.9
Gaming graphics
3D business and gaming graphics
6.3
Primary hard disk
Disk data transfer rate
5.9
PC Mark
PCMark Vantage7436 points
PCMark 73529 points
Help

Graphics Card

Contrary to the cards of the 7700M, 7800M and 7900M series, the Radeon HD 7670M is still manufactured in the old 40nm process, and is based on the 5D shader architecture of the HD-5000 series, to the detriment of energy efficiency.

As specified by AMD, HP runs the 480 shader units at 600 Mhz, and connects 2 GB of DDR3 VRAM (900 Mhz) via the 128-bit memory interface. Overall, the HD 7670M reaches about the same level of performance as an NVIDIA GeForce GT 620M/630M, which ranks in the lower midrange. In the performance preset of 3DMark 11, the final score was 1172 points - similar to the Zenbook UX32VD, but with its speedy GeForce GT 640M, the Timeline Ultra M3-581TG leads by more than 50 percent.

On battery power, the GPU throttles its frequency to 400 Mhz, which significantly limits 3D performance (3DMark 11: 700 points). While that's still a bit faster than the integrated Intel HD Graphics 4000, HP clearly sacrifices some graphics performance in favor of a longer battery life.

3D Mark
3DMark 0512573 points
3DMark 06
 1280x1024
7539 points
3DMark Vantage4774 points
3DMark 111172 points
Help

Gaming Performance

Fifa 12
Fifa 12

The Radeon HD 7670M, as well as the identical HD 6650M have made it to our test bench several times - you will find the corresponding bench marks in our GPU database.

In line with expectations from the synthetic 3DMark test, in games, too, the graphics card performs pretty much on par with the GeForce GT 620M, which makes it see eye to eye with the Aspire V5-571G: Many current games, like Deus Ex: Human Revolution or Anno 2070 are playable at the display's native resolution of 1366x768 pixels and medium detail settings. Particularly demanding titles, such as Alan Wake, may require somewhat reduced settings, while older or less complex games like FIFA 12 leave some performance reserves, that can be used for additional features such as anti-aliasing or anisotropic filters.

Compared to the HD Graphics 4000, the 7670M has a comfortable advantage of between 50 and 100% that also comes through in practice.

low med.high ultra
Deus Ex Human Revolution (2011) 92.637.2fps
Fifa 12 (2011) 172.311283.249.2fps
Anno 2070 (2011) 83.435.622.6fps
Alan Wake (2012) 32.519.7fps

Emissions

System Noise

The warm summer weather of recent weeks has lasted throughout our test, so the HP Envy 6 had to undergo the following measurements under outside temperatures of 25 to 26 degrees centigrade. As a result, the fan was already spinning relentlessly at idle, but keeping fairly quiet at about 33 dB(A)

Under load, the fan spins up much higher, and reaches up to 40.4 dB(A). Thanks to its constant speed and a sound frequency that's subjectively not too bothersome, this level of noise seems acceptable and in line with expectations given the slim construction and the decent performance. Comparable notebooks like the Gigabyte U2442N or the Acer Aspire M3-581TG got sometimes considerably louder during our stress test.

Noise Level

Idle 33 / 33 / 33.1 dB(A)
HDD 33.1 dB(A)
Load 40.4 / 40.4 dB(A)
 
    30 dB
silent
40 dB
audible
50 dB
loud
 
min: , med: , max:    Voltcraft SL 320 (15 cm distance)

Temperature

Stress test
Stress test

HP makes use of the aluminum surfaces to channel part of the heat generated by the CPU and graphics card out of the case. While this helps to keep the hardware cool, the effect this has on the user are less fortunate: Even at idle, the case warms up to an average of 34 degrees centigrade. After prolonged periods of full load, temperatures in excess of 40 degrees were reached, even though that sounds more dramatic than it feels in practice. Firstly, extreme temperatures of 45 degrees were only recorded near the air vent, which is located on the back and out of reach of the user's hands. Secondly, temperatures reached during the stress test represent a theoretical maximum, and will rarely be encountered in real life. On the contrary, the Envy 6 can usually be placed on your lap without problems.

The efficiency of the cooling system is reflected in our temperature measurements from inside the case: After about 60 minutes of running Prime95, the Core i5 settles on about 77 degrees centigrade, while the Radeon GPU heats up to no more than 65 degrees centigrade during the FurMark test. With these low values, it's surprising that HP severely restricts the processor's Turbo Boost function: After just a few minutes, the CPU throttles down to its base rate of 1.7 Ghz. In our opinion, the cooling design would be well capable of dealing with higher clock speeds.

Max. Load
 49.6 °C49.5 °C38 °C 
 42.7 °C42 °C31.9 °C 
 34 °C31.4 °C30.6 °C 
Maximum: 49.6 °C
Average: 38.9 °C
30.5 °C51.7 °C54 °C
29.4 °C51.3 °C44.5 °C
29 °C34 °C34.3 °C
Maximum: 54 °C
Average: 39.9 °C
Power Supply (max.)  48.7 °C | Room Temperature 25.5 °C | Voltcraft IR-360

Speakers

Beats Audio control panel
Beats Audio control panel

A large "Beats Audio" sticker is prominently displayed on the box, suggesting exceptional sound quality. Two stereo speakers located above the keyboard and a small subwoofer hidden within the case are tasked with keeping that promise.

In practice, our high expectations were only partly fulfilled. The audio presets configured by the manufacturer are all biased towards the high end, but lack mid tones and bass. With a few adjustments, however, a pretty well balanced soundscape can be reached, with the exception of basses that remain disappointing. Still, the speakers are adequate for playing the occasional movie or music and deliver a volume adequate for filling a medium sized room if required. Hi-Fi aficionados will be able to connect their home cinema system via the HDMI adapter, while headphones can be connected to the 3.5 millimeter audio jack.

Battery Life

Power Consumption

Unlike most Ultrabooks, which are optimized to consume as little power as possible, HP tries to strike a balance between performance and energy efficiency with the Envy 6. Thanks to the dynamic graphics switching, the approach works very well at idle: only 6 to 8.4 Watts are the hallmarks of a perfectly configured system, and match the values of most competitors that don't include a dedicated GPU.

Due to the fact that the Radeon HD 7670M is manufactured in the 40 nanometer process, we expected a relatively high power uptake during games. But far from it: In 3DMark 06, the laptop contends itself with only 37.6 Watts, and the 42.4 Watts during the stress test represent a remarkably low value, too. To be fair, these figures are largely resulting from the inactive CPU Turbo Boost - during the first few seconds when the CPU runs at 2.4 Ghz, the power consumption slightly exceeds the 50 Watts mark. Nevertheless, the Envy 6 does a remarkable job in this area, on par with the Acer Aspire V5-571G, which features a 28 nanometer GPU.

The power supply is rated at 65 Watts, which is adequate for this laptop.

Power Consumption

Off / Standby 0.1 / 0.4 Watt
Idle 6.0 / 8.1 / 8.4 Watt
Load 37.6 / 42.4 Watt
 
Key: min: , med: , max:         Voltcraft VC 940

Battery Life

The inclusion of a large 60 Wh battery is intended to provide good battery life - up to 8 hours are promised by the manufacturer.

Our tests show that HP really has not been overly optimistic with that statement. Under optimum conditions (energy saving settings, minimum display brightness, wireless modules disabled), we managed more than 9 hours during the Battery Eater Reader’s Test, which put the Envy 6 among the best of the competition.

Even in the more realistic WLAN test (energy saving settings, display brightness 150 cd/m²), the user can browse the web for almost six hours before the notebook needs to be plugged in again. In terms of battery life, the HP Envy 6 outperforms both the Aspire V5-571G as well as the Zenbook UX32VD, both of which are equipped with smaller batteries.

Under maximum load, simulated using the Battery Eater Classic Test, the notebook benefits from the reduced GPU speed and manages a run time of a full two 2 hours. The required charge takes about 15 minutes more, depending on whether or not the laptop is in use while charging.

Readers Test
maximum battery life (Readers Test)
Classic Test
minimum battery life (Classic Test)
Recharging
Recharging
Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
9h 04min
WiFi Surfing
5h 51min
Load (maximum brightness)
2h 05min

Verdict

HP Envy 6-1000sg
HP Envy 6-1000sg

Ultrabooks are coming of age: Thanks to its dedicated graphics card, the HP Envy 6-1000sg can be transformed from an enduring travel companion into a gaming-capable all-rounder if required. 

Even though the Radeon HD 7670M may no longer represent the cutting edge of technology, it is still capable of running most current games fluently, and also wins our favor with a surprisingly good power efficiency. At idle, the Envy 6 works just as economically as most of its competitors, and reaches a superb battery life that exceeds even the manufacturer's claims.

Unfortunately, the inferior screen disqualifies the notebook for outdoor use. Both the sub-average brightness and the glossy finish keep the user locked indoors - a double blow, considering that the Ultrabook has been designed for portability. The poor Wi-Fi reception just adds to the poor performance here.

We're left with a slightly ambivalent feeling: For about 750 Euros (~$969), you get a well-made multimedia notebook, but judged by the key criteria of an Ultrabook, it falls short. In the same price region, there are both more powerful and more mobile alternatives - HP has tried to make a compromise between the two. As a result, the Envy 6 is perhaps most directly comparable to models such as the Aspire V5-571G or the Aspire TimelineU M5-581TG, both manufactured by Acer. We weren't able to establish a clear front runner, so the buyer is left with the choice depending on personal preferences, and has to balance price, performance and features.

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In Review: HP Envy 6-1000sg, provided by:
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Specifications

HP Envy 6-1000sg
Processor
Graphics adapter
AMD Radeon HD 7670M - 2048 MB, Core: 600 MHz, Memory: 900 MHz, DDR3-VRAM, 8.933.3.3000, AMD Dynamic Switchable Graphics (Enduro)
Memory
4096 MB 
, 1x 4096 MByte Hynix DDR3-1600 CL11, 2 slots
Display
15.6 inch 16:9, 1366x768 pixel, CMN15B6, TN panel, LED backlight, glossy: yes
Mainboard
Intel HM77 (Panther Point)
Harddisk
Hitachi HTS545032A7E380 + 32 GByte Samsung SSD 830, 320 GB 
5400 rpm 2.5" HDD + SSD-cache (mSATA)
Soundcard
Intel Panther Point PCH - High Definition Audio Controller
Connections
1 USB 2.0, 2 USB 3.0, 1 HDMI, 1 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: headphone + microphone (3.5 millimetres), Card Reader: 2-in-1-card reader (SD, MMC),
Networking
Realtek RTL8168/8111 Gigabit-LAN (10/100/1000MBit), Broadcom 4313 802.11b/g/n (b g n ), 3.0 + HS Bluetooth
Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 19.8 x 374 x 253 ( = 0.78 x 14.72 x 9.96 in)
Weight
2.15 kg ( = 75.84 oz) Power Supply: 200 g ( = 7.05 oz)
Battery
60 Wh Lithium-Ion, 14,8 volts, 4 cells
Price
750 Euro
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit
Additional features
Webcam: 1.3 Megapixel, Speakers: stereo, Keyboard: chiclet, Keyboard Light: no, 65 watts power supply, brochures, CyberLink YouCam, Adobe Reader, 24 Months Warranty

 

[+] compare
Sleek design, ...
Sleek design, ...
Despite the subwoofer, the sound quality lacks bass.
Despite the subwoofer, the sound quality lacks bass.
The input devices are of average quality.
The input devices are of average quality.
Prolific typists would appreciate a better feedback from the keyboard.
Prolific typists would appreciate a better feedback from the keyboard.
A shiny metal frame adorns the touchpad.
A shiny metal frame adorns the touchpad.
The Ultrabook is not fit for outdoor use, ...
The Ultrabook is not fit for outdoor use, ...
the screen is too dark and shows strong reflections.
the screen is too dark and shows strong reflections.
Let's take a look at the matte red underside:
Let's take a look at the matte red underside:
This is where the notebook sucks in fresh air...
This is where the notebook sucks in fresh air...
and where it can be opened if necessary.
and where it can be opened if necessary.
We would not recommend this procedure to beginners.
We would not recommend this procedure to beginners.
After the screws come off, the RAM may be upgraded...
After the screws come off, the RAM may be upgraded...
or the hard disk can be replaced.
or the hard disk can be replaced.
HP has fitted a 32 GB module by Samsung to the mSATA slot.
HP has fitted a 32 GB module by Samsung to the mSATA slot.
but also the Beats Audio system.
but also the Beats Audio system.
HP does not just advertise the integrated Radeon graphics card...
HP does not just advertise the integrated Radeon graphics card...
A collapsible LAN port is also included.
A collapsible LAN port is also included.
slim silhouette:
slim silhouette:
Apart from the flamboyant colour scheme...
Apart from the flamboyant colour scheme...
the Envy 6 is a typical Ultrabook.
the Envy 6 is a typical Ultrabook.
Its 15.6 inch screen make it one of the larger models, ...
Its 15.6 inch screen make it one of the larger models, ...
but with a weight of only 2.15 kg it remains portable.
but with a weight of only 2.15 kg it remains portable.
Despite the low thickness...
Despite the low thickness...
the case proved to be quite resilient...
the case proved to be quite resilient...
Thanks to the firm aluminium, that also looks the part.
Thanks to the firm aluminium, that also looks the part.
In general, the two-tone design is appealing, ...
In general, the two-tone design is appealing, ...
making many competitors look sad and dull.
making many competitors look sad and dull.
Much less convincing is the low range of ports.
Much less convincing is the low range of ports.
At least, there are a total of three USB ports, ...
At least, there are a total of three USB ports, ...
two of which support the fast USB 3.0 standard.
two of which support the fast USB 3.0 standard.
The battery is fixed, and provides 60 Wh of power.
The battery is fixed, and provides 60 Wh of power.

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Price Comparison

Pro

+high applications performance
+gaming capability
+SSD cache
+decent speakers
+good workmanship
+long battery life
 

Cons

-glossy and dim display
-limited choice of connectors
-GPU throttling on battery
-slow and low range wifi

Shortcut

What we liked

Unlike most of its rivals, the Envy 6 is ready for more than just web browsing and mobile work: The dedicated Radeon graphics card  qualifies the Ultrabook as a combile companion for the next LAN party. Gamers may not always be able to play at the highest settings, but the HD 7670M beats the integrated HD Graphics 4000 by a mile.

What we'd like to see

As we've seen so often, it's the display that prevents a better rating: poor contrast, glossy and much too dark, it's the weak spot of an otherwise pretty decent notebook.

What surprises us

Surprisingly, the Radeon HD 7670M that's still made in the old 40 nanometer process appears to work just as efficiently as Nvidia's new 28 nanometer GPU GeForce GT 620M.

The competition

Even though it isn't an Ultrabook, the Acer Aspire V5-571G has much in common with the Envy 6. Another alternative with an even faster graphics card is the Aspire TimelineU M5-581TG. Most other Ultrabooks like the Lenovo IdeaPad U410 either cannot keep up, or cost a lot more, like the Dells XPS 14.

Rating

HP Envy 6-1000sg
08/12/2012 v3
Till Schönborn

Chassis
83%
Keyboard
86%
Pointing Device
82%
Connectivity
62%
Weight
86%
Battery
90%
Display
69%
Games Performance
77%
Application Performance
92%
Temperature
75%
Noise
83%
Add Points
80%
Average
80%
82%
Multimedia *
Weighted Average

> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Archive of our own reviews > Review HP Envy 6-1000sg Ultrabook
Author: Till Schönborn, 2012-09-12 (Update: 2013-06- 6)