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Unconfirmed Surface Pro 5 renders show a largely unchanged design

Unconfirmed Surface Pro 5 renders show a largely unchanged design
Unconfirmed Surface Pro 5 renders show a largely unchanged design
The leaked images show the exact same port selection as on the Surface Pro 4 with no Thunderbolt 3 or even USB Type-C options.

Microsoft is expected to unveil the next generation Surface Pro in just a few days on May 23rd during an event in Shanghai, China. Rumors are also claiming that the next Surface Pro may be dropping the number from its name for a more straightforward "Surface Pro" advertising approach. The 18-month old Surface Pro 4 is overdue for a proper successor and now may be the time for an official announcement since ULV U-class Kaby Lake processors are in ample supply.

While it is unclear what updates the next Surface Pro will bring, the latest leaks suggest that not much could change aside from some internal updates. Perhaps most frightening, port selection appears to be identical to the Surface Pro 4 and this could mean no USB Type-C or Thunderbolt 3 integration. The omissions of these connectivity options alone could repulse a large number of users who may have been expecting more from Microsoft's premier tablet series.

The unverified source also shows at least three other color options beyond the standard Silver that we've grown accustomed to. We should find out early next week if any of the new information is true regarding the next generation Surface Pro.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 05 > Unconfirmed Surface Pro 5 renders show a largely unchanged design
Allen Ngo, 2017-05-21 (Update: 2017-05-21)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.