Notebookcheck

Microsoft demonstrates native 32-bit applications running on Windows 10 ARM

Microsoft demonstrates native x86 applications running on ARM-based Windows 10
Microsoft demonstrates native x86 applications running on ARM-based Windows 10
The emulation process will be slightly slower than if running on a native x86 platform, but users may not notice the difference.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a loyal reader of notebookcheck? Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team!

Especially wanted: 
Review Editor - 
Details here
News Editor - Details here

 

 

 

 

Microsoft really wants us to know that the upcoming ARM-based Windows 10 OS will not have any issues running existing 32-bit x86 applications. During the Microsoft Build conference, the Redmond company demonstrated an early build of Windows 10 ARM with all the basic features we've come to expect from the OS including the task manager and full support for USB.

The video below shows a Windows 10 ARM system installing the popular unpacking program 7Zip without any changes or adjustments to the source code from its developers. Microsoft is even promising that the OS will run these programs and those from the Windows App Store at "almost" native speeds to the point where users will not notice any performance gaps in practice. 

The ability to run and install standard x86 Windows applications under an ARM environment is likely a top priority for Microsoft. The Surface RT, for example, died a quick death due largely to its lack of software support. A new emulation solution will ensure that all or most existing Windows applications can run on future ARM-based Windows 10 portables even if there is a performance deficit.

Source(s)

Read all 1 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 05 > Microsoft demonstrates native 32-bit applications running on Windows 10 ARM
Allen Ngo, 2017-05-15 (Update: 2017-05-15)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.