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Umidigi Uwatch GT smartwatch with heart rate monitor and Bluetooth launching this December

Umidigi Uwatch GT smartwatch with heart rate monitor and Bluetooth launching this December (Source: Umidigi)
Umidigi Uwatch GT smartwatch with heart rate monitor and Bluetooth launching this December (Source: Umidigi)
The Android and iOS-compatible smartwatch promises 15 days of battery life, a plastic case, and a 240 x 240 resolution display for just under $80 USD.

Apple may be the unrivaled champ in the smartwatch space, but that doesn't mean there aren't any worthwhile alternatives in the market. Fitness trackers and smartwatches from Chinese manufacturers are generally more affordable while still providing many of the expected features including Bluetooth 5 connectivity, waterproof chassis, and a heat rate monitor.

The upcoming Umidigi Uwatch GT includes a 1.3-inch round color display protected by tempered glass with up to 50 mm of water resistance. The OEM is also promising 15 days of battery life or 24 hours of constant heart rate monitoring via the integrated HX3600 optical sensor. Its aptly named VeryFitPro app will work on both Android 4.4+ or iOS 9.0+ with support for 12 sports modes and SMS notifications.

AliExpress has the Umidigi Uwatch GT for pre-order starting today for $80 and an expected ship date of December 2. Initial colors will be Matte Black and Midnight Green.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 11 > Umidigi Uwatch GT smartwatch with heart rate monitor and Bluetooth launching this December
Allen Ngo, 2019-11-11 (Update: 2019-11-11)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.