Notebookcheck

UHS-III standard will support SD card transfer rates of up to 624 MB/s

UHS-III standard will support MicroSD transfer rates of up to 624 MB/s
UHS-III standard will support MicroSD transfer rates of up to 624 MB/s
The new specification is coming this year and will make VR recording at even higher resolutions possible.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Especially English native speakers welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Video recording at resolutions greater than 1080p is becoming more common on consumer devices. 360-degree or 4K recording across multiple simultaneous cameras, for example, are now available on consumer drones. The growing demand for faster storage bandwidth has alerted the SD Association to create a new standard to succeed the current UHS-II standard commonly found on most smartphones and other devices.

The UHS-II standard supports theoretical transfer rates of up to 312 MB/s, which is just slightly faster than the current fastest SD card available from Sony at 300 MB/s. The new UHS-III standard aims to double this theoretical maximum to 624 MB/s without changing SD card sizes or electrical contacts to maintain backwards compatibility. Thus, UHS-II SD cards will work on devices with UHS-III card readers. New standards for more SDHC and SDXC subclasses will also be likely.

Devices with integrated UHS-III card readers are expected to ship before the end of this year. We fully expect major manufacturers to announce their first sets of UHS-III-compatible SD cards around the same time as well.

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 02 > UHS-III standard will support SD card transfer rates of up to 624 MB/s
Allen Ngo, 2017-02-27 (Update: 2017-02-27)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.