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UHS-III standard will support SD card transfer rates of up to 624 MB/s

UHS-III standard will support MicroSD transfer rates of up to 624 MB/s
UHS-III standard will support MicroSD transfer rates of up to 624 MB/s
The new specification is coming this year and will make VR recording at even higher resolutions possible.

Video recording at resolutions greater than 1080p is becoming more common on consumer devices. 360-degree or 4K recording across multiple simultaneous cameras, for example, are now available on consumer drones. The growing demand for faster storage bandwidth has alerted the SD Association to create a new standard to succeed the current UHS-II standard commonly found on most smartphones and other devices.

The UHS-II standard supports theoretical transfer rates of up to 312 MB/s, which is just slightly faster than the current fastest SD card available from Sony at 300 MB/s. The new UHS-III standard aims to double this theoretical maximum to 624 MB/s without changing SD card sizes or electrical contacts to maintain backwards compatibility. Thus, UHS-II SD cards will work on devices with UHS-III card readers. New standards for more SDHC and SDXC subclasses will also be likely.

Devices with integrated UHS-III card readers are expected to ship before the end of this year. We fully expect major manufacturers to announce their first sets of UHS-III-compatible SD cards around the same time as well.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 02 > UHS-III standard will support SD card transfer rates of up to 624 MB/s
Allen Ngo, 2017-02-27 (Update: 2017-02-27)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.