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Analysts expect SSD prices to rise next year

Analysts expect SSD prices to rise next year
Analysts expect SSD prices to rise next year
Both MLC and TLC SSDs could rise by as much as 10 percent due to growing demand over traditional HDDs in consumer electronics.

TrendForce is predicting significant price hikes on MLC (Multi-Level Cell) SSDs starting early 2017 by as much as 6 to 10 percent compared to average prices from Q3 2016. Meanwhile, TLC (Triple-Level Cell) SSDs could go up by as much as 6 to 9 percent during the same period. Price gaps between 128 GB and 256 GB SSDs and even 500 GB and 1 TB HDDs could become wider as well.

Analysts are not expecting prices to fall back down anytime soon due to high worldwide demand for SSDs and it becoming a bottleneck for various manufacturers. The global notebook market currently has a 30 percent adoption rate for SSDs according to TrendForce and this could climb to more than 50 percent by 2018. The total number of customers with client-grade SSDs on notebooks and desktops has been estimated to be 32.3 million as of Q3 2016 to represent an increase of 20 percent over Q2 2016.

Asus recently announced that it would offer SSD options on all of its notebooks including on its budget models commonly found on brick and mortar locations. The increase in worldwide smartphone shipments this year and the hastening transition to SSD-based PCs are likely all contributing to the demand and manufacturing bottleneck.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 12 > Analysts expect SSD prices to rise next year
Allen Ngo, 2016-12- 6 (Update: 2016-12- 6)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.