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Toshiba XG6 NVMe SSD series is first to utilize 96-layer 3D flash memory modules

Toshiba XG6 NVMe SSD series is first to utilize 96-layer 3D flash memory modules (Source: Toshiba)
Toshiba XG6 NVMe SSD series is first to utilize 96-layer 3D flash memory modules (Source: Toshiba)
When compared to 64-bit 3D flash, Toshiba's 96-layer BiCS flash technology promises to consume 4.7 W less power while providing potentially higher storage capacities. The OEM intends to launch its XG6 series soon for high-performance client PCs and laptops where competition from Samsung, Lite-On, and SK Hynix is fierce.

With Toshiba now winding down its ailing laptop business, the Japanese manufacturer will be focusing more on its storage and RAM solutions for both clients and enterprises. Its latest product is the XG6 NVMe SSD designed for client PCs and high-performance gaming or mobile systems.

The key innovation of the new XG6 series is its 96-layer 3D NAND flash memory compared to existing SSDs that utilize 64-layer 3D NAND flash. The higher density allows Toshiba to fit in approximately 40 percent more storage per volume without requiring more power or producing more heat in the process.

Sequential read and write rates will top out at 3180 MB/s and 3000 MB/s, respectively, via the PCIe x4 interface. Despite the higher storage density, however, Toshiba will only be offering the XG6 in 256 GB, 512 GB, and 1024 GB capacities for now. Toshiba SSDs are commonly found on laptops and tablets ranging from the Dell XPS series to the Microsoft Surface Laptop.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2018 07 > Toshiba XG6 NVMe SSD series is first to utilize 96-layer 3D flash memory modules
Allen Ngo, 2018-07-24 (Update: 2018-07-24)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.