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Schenker unveils XMG Core 15 gaming notebook with GTX 1060 graphics

Schenker unveils XMG Core 15 gaming notebook with GTX 1060 graphics (Source: Schenker)
Schenker unveils XMG Core 15 gaming notebook with GTX 1060 graphics (Source: Schenker)
The 15.6-inch notebook is likely based off of a Clevo barebones and is now shipping for just under 1000 Euros. The notebook will compete against the Gigabyte Sabre 15 and the recently announced Dell Inspiron 7577.

The XMG Core 15 is Schenker's attempt to appeal to core gamers at a more affordable price range without sacrificing performance. As a result, the system strips away many of the eye-catching gimmicks found on other pricier gaming notebooks like LED lights, warpaint skins, "edgy" designs, and other embellishments that can be considered more flash than substance. What's left is a no-frills jet black chassis with standard white LED keyboard lighting.

Aside from the barebones gaming approach, core specifications are otherwise the common Kaby Lake and Pascal options:

Other hardware features like NVMe, a dedicated subwoofer, USB Type-C Gen. 1, and mini-DisplayPort 1.4 w/ G-Sync are all integrated onto the machine. Nonetheless, it's unlikely that any configuration will support Thunderbolt 3, 4K UHD, or GPU options greater than the GTX 1060. It's curious to see no Max-Q options, but our guess is that their inclusion would have likely bumped starting prices higher than what Schenker wants to be aiming for.

The XMG Core 15 is now configurable for a starting price of 1000 Euros and will likely make its way to North America under a different reseller brand.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 09 > Schenker unveils XMG Core 15 gaming notebook with GTX 1060 graphics
Allen Ngo, 2017-09- 1 (Update: 2017-09- 1)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.