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Samsung intros 256 GB UFS 2.0 embedded memory

Samsung 256 GB UFS 2.0 embedded memory chips
Samsung 256 GB UFS 2.0
The world’s first 256 GB UFS 2.0 embedded memory chip for next-gen high-end smartphones has just entered mass production, only one year after its 128 GB predecessor.

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Although only a few top-of-the-line handsets feature 128 GB of internal storage for now, 256 GB smartphones and phablets will soon become a reality. As usual, the force behind this is Samsung, who has just announced that mass production of the industry's first 256 GB UFS 2.0 embedded memory has begun.

According to Samsung, the new Samsung UFS chip is based on the most advanced V-NAND flash memory technology, using a high-end controller specially designed for it. The new embedded memory based on UFS 2.0 can handle up to 45k/40k IOPS random reads/writes, while the previous generation topped at 19k/14k.

The 256 GB UFS 2.0 memory is almost twice as fast as the average SATA SSDs used in desktops and laptop PCs, providing sequential read speeds up to 850 MB/s. Its sequential write performance reaches 260 MB/s - about three times better than high-end microSD cards.

While handsets with 256 GB of internal storage might not become popular too soon, Samsung will also use the new embedded memory for its premium storage products that use V-NAND flash memory.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 02 > Samsung intros 256 GB UFS 2.0 embedded memory
Codrut Nistor, 2016-02-25 (Update: 2016-02-25)
Codrut Nistor
Codrut Nistor - News Editor
Although I have been writing about new software and hardware for almost a decade, I consider myself to be old school. I always enjoy listening to music on CD or tape instead of digital files and I will not even get into the touchscreen vs physical keys debate. However, I also enjoy new technology, as I now have the chance to take a look at the future every day. I joined the Notebookcheck crew back in 2013 and I have no plans to leave the ship anytime soon.