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Paint and other legacy features to get axed in the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

The Fall Creators Update could witness some popular legacy features getting axed. (Source: Windows Central)
The Fall Creators Update could witness some popular legacy features getting axed. (Source: Windows Central)
The upcoming feature update to Windows 10, the Fall Creators Update, will see many legacy features in Windows getting removed or deprecated: the most noticeable among them being the classic Paint program, System Image Backup and screensaver functionality, amongst others.

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The upcoming feature update to Windows 10, the Fall Creators Update (FCU), will see some legacy feature trimming. Microsoft has released a list of features that will either be removed or deprecated in the FCU. This is likely in the interest of streamlining the codebase for performance and security.

Features that are deprecated include —

  • IIS 6 Management Compatibility 
  • IIS Digest Authentication 
  • Microsoft Paint 
  • RSA/AES Encryption for IIS 
  • Sync Your Settings 
  • Screen saver functionality in Themes 
  • System Image Backup (SIB) Solution 
  • TLS RC4 Ciphers 
  • Trusted Platform Module (TPM): TPM.msc and TPM RemoteManagement 
  • Trusted Platform Module (TPM) Remote Management 
  • Windows Hello for Business deployment that uses System Center Configuration Manager 
  • Windows PowerShell 2.0

Features that will be removed include —

  • 3D Builder 
  • Apndatabase.xml 
  • Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET) 
  • Outlook Express 
  • Reader app 
  • Reading List 
  • Screen saver functionality in Themes 
  • Syskey.exe 
  • TCP Offload Engine 
  • Tile Data Layer 
  • Trusted Platform Module (TPM) Owner Password Management

While removing or deprecating legacy features has always been a standard practice, the above list might bring cheer or disdain based on how one looks at it. For example, long time users of Windows attest to the ease of use of the classic Paint program for basic picture edits. Similarly, the 3D Builder app was received well for basic 3D model creation and 3D printing. Microsoft wants users to use the new Paint 3D program that debuted in the Creators Update for both 2D and 3D work, which might not augur well everyone. Some of the legacy features however, are getting an upgrade. We reported earlier about the new features in Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection, which will supersede legacy features such as the Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET) that is getting removed in the FCU. Also, Sync Your Settings is undergoing a back-end change that will unify both enterprise and consumer sync settings under one cloud storage. Microsoft Edge has features from the Reader and Reading List apps therefore, removing them is probably justified to reduce redundancy. As for deprecation of System Image Backup (SIB), Microsoft recommends using third-party solutions.

Microsoft notes that the list of features removed or deprecated is not final and is subject to change. The list is being made available so that admins and end-users can start the necessary planning and testing before migrating their systems to the FCU. The FCU is scheduled to launch sometime this October.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 07 > Paint and other legacy features to get axed in the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2017-07-24 (Update: 2017-07-24)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.