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Next Meizu smartphone could come with a Samsung Exynos 8890 SoC

Next Meizu smartphone could come with a Samsung Exynos 8890 SoC
Next Meizu smartphone could come with a Samsung Exynos 8890 SoC
Meizu has sent out invitations for a press event next week hinting at an Exynos-powered device.

Meizu is expected to refresh its MX series of smartphones during a press event scheduled for August 10th. Interestingly, the letter invitation itself shows a large "E" with no surrounding letters or captions. While this doesn't imply much on its own, it adds fuel to the fire that Meizu's past disputes with Qualcomm may have pushed the company towards incorporating the Samsung Exynos platform instead of the Snapdragon platform for its future smartphones.

Nonetheless, the invite could simply be hinting towards a new E series of smartphones from the Chinese manufacturer. Leaked pictures of the supposed device claim that it will sport the high-end Exynos 8890 SoC, so it's entirely possible that Meizu could be taking the existing MX series design and simply swapping out the SoC.

Beyond the smartphone rumors, Meizu is expected to unveil a smartwatch as well based on the leaked images. The model may be equipped with a Rockchip RK6321 SoC with two Cortex-A5 cores and without Android Wear. Note that the sources of these images cannot be verified, so these leaks should be taken with a grain of salt until the official unveiling next week.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 08 > Next Meizu smartphone could come with a Samsung Exynos 8890 SoC
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-08- 5 (Update: 2016-08- 5)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.