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Meizu M3E launches in China for 175 Euros

Meizu M3E launches in China for 175 Euros
Meizu M3E launches in China for 175 Euros
The 5.5-inch budget device has already attracted 3 million new registrations within just 24 hours of its announcement.

Meizu has announced an entry-level smartphone for the Chinese market in the form of the M3E. According to the manufacturer, more than three million users registered online to participate in a flash sale just one day after the announcement of the M3E. This latest model is likely a supplement to the current Note M3 as specifications are nearly identical except for the larger 4100 mAh battery pack on the latter.

As such, the specifications for the M3E are as follows:

  • 5.5-inch 2.5D FHD IPS display
  • MediaTek Helio P10 SoC
  • 3 GB RAM
  • 32 GB eMMC 5.1
  • Dual-SIM
  • LTE Cat. 6
  • 13 MP rear f/2.2 PDAF Sony IMX258 + 5 MP front f/2.0 cameras
  • Dual-band 802.11n + Bluetooth 4.1, GPS
  • USB Type-C
  • 3100 mAh battery w/ fast charging
  • Android 5.1 w/ Meizu Flyme 5.2.1

The front Home button also includes a fingerprint sensor for fast unlocking. The M3E is now on sale in China for the equivalent of 175 Euros and an official launch in European territories is unlikely. Note that the smartphone is likely lacking support for major European LTE bands for those intent on importing the device. The original Meizu M3 launched in China this past March.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 08 > Meizu M3E launches in China for 175 Euros
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-08-16 (Update: 2016-08-17)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.