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Lenovo finalizes user-made Moto Z Mod concepts

Lenovo finalizes user-made Moto Z Mod concepts
Lenovo finalizes user-made Moto Z Mod concepts
The top twelve finalists will battle it out on Indiegogo for the grand prize of $1 million USD. Potential winning concepts including an attachable solar panel, additional smart home controls, and an anti-bacterial Moto Mod.

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Lenovo has turned to a new comedic commercial as shown below to advertise its accessory-driven Moto Z smartphone, but the manufacturer is staying true to its word of honoring a competition announced last year to gather user-made concepts for potential Moto Mod production.

The "Transform the Smartphone" challenge drew over 700 contestants across 55 countries to submit unique Moto Mod ideas and concepts for a grand prize of $1 million USD. The final 12 are as listed below and will be further narrowed through crowdfunding campaigns. Readers can vote with their wallets for the best or most practical Moto Mod.

Our full review on the Moto Z can be found here. It was one of the first major smartphones to ship without the ubiquitous 3.5 mm headphone jack and is subsequently extremely thin at just under 5.2 mm. It is one of our most highest-rated phones due in part to its light chassis, bright AMOLED display, and fast performance. Existing Moto Mod accessories include more powerful speakers, secondary batteries, and even a mini projector.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 02 > Lenovo finalizes user-made Moto Z Mod concepts
Allen Ngo, 2017-02-16 (Update: 2017-02-16)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.