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Individual Macbook Pro chargers don't come with a USB-C cable

Individual chargers for Apple's new Macbook Pro notebooks don't include the cable required to charge the device. (Source: Apple)
Individual chargers for Apple's new Macbook Pro notebooks don't include the cable required to charge the device. (Source: Apple)
Macbook Pro users hoping to buy additional chargers for their new device will have to provide their own USB Type-C cables.

Apple has been no stranger to controversy this year. From removing the headphone jack on the new iPhone 7 to equipping the new Macbook Pro with only USB Type-C ports, the Cupertino giant has constantly been in the news for months for its debatable hardware decisions. While many consumers are willing to overlook these seemingly consumer-hostile changes, they may be pushed over the edge with Apple’s decision to ship Macbook Pro power adapters without the cable needed to charge the notebook.

Apple sells extra or replacement 87 and 61 Watt chargers for the Macbook Pro 15- and 13-inch models, respectively, through its online store. Purchased for $69-79, the shipped box includes only the power adapter with a two-pronged attachment used to plug into an outlet. As noted by Ben Lovejoy at 9to5mac.com, a USB Type-C cable, which is necessary to plug the adapter into a Macbook Pro for power and charging, is glaringly absent. Also missing is an extension attachment for the power adapter. Some consumers are echoing Lovejoy’s disdain for these omissions, who decried the move as "taking the penny-pinching a step too far.”

Apple does include a power adapter and USB Type-C cable in the box with new Macbook Pro computers, but the extension cable is no longer shipped with the devices and must be bought separately.

While Macbook Pro users can purchase a 2 meter USB Type-C cable and extension cable from Apple’s website for $19 each, they also have the option to use third-party cables and extensions. Buyers should exercise caution, though, as not all USB Type-C cables are created equal. Google has recently expressed concern about the charging capabilities of various USB Type-C cables, stating that manufacturers that make changes or additions to the charging protocol may produce charging cables that can damage mobile devices. 

It should also be noted that the extension cable sold through Apple's site may not be compatible with the new Macbook Pro's power adapter. The extension cable is listed as ready for use with "MagSafe and MagSafe 2 power adapters and 10W, 12W, and 29W USB power adapters." The new Macbook Pro's power adapters are rated at 87 and 61 Watts, while the MagSafe and MagSafe 2 adapters are rated at 85 and 60 Watts. 

The exclusion of the USB Type-C cable may simply be a decision to unify Apple’s product line, as iPhone and iPad power adapters also exclude the lightning cables necessary to charge the devices. However, the decision may not bode well with consumers who already see the Macbook Pro’s sparse port selection as a move by Apple to increase revenue through the sale of adapters and dongles.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 11 > Individual Macbook Pro chargers don't come with a USB-C cable
Sam Medley, 2016-11-10 (Update: 2016-11-10)
Sam Medley
Sam Medley - Review Editor - @samuel_medley
I've been a "tech-head" my entire life. After graduating college with a degree in Mathematics, I worked in finance and banking a few years before taking a job as a Systems Analyst for my local school district. I started working with Notebookcheck in October of 2016 and have enjoyed writing news articles and notebook reviews. My areas of interest include the business side of technology, retro gaming, Linux, and innovative gadgets. When I'm not hunched over an electronic device or writing code for a new database, I'm either outside with my family, playing a decade-old video game, or sitting behind a drum set.