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HP announces the ZBook Studio X360 G5 with workstation internals in a consumer-style body

HP ZBook Studio x360 G5. (Source: HP)
HP ZBook Studio x360 G5. (Source: HP)
The newly announced HP ZBook Studio x360 G5 is a creator and designer focused convertible that packs workstation class Intel Xeon and Nvidia Quadro hardware into a flexible device. It features a screen that meets 100% of the AdobeRGB color standard and a pen with 4000 levels of sensitivity. HP claims it is the most powerful convertible notebook in the world, placing it ahead of the Microsoft Surface Book 2 and new Dell XPS 15 9575

As part of the refresh of the ZBook line, HP has announced the ZBook Studio X360 G5, which puts the hardware expected inside a workstation into a 360-degree hinge design that is more typical of a consumer laptop. HP claims that this is the world’s most powerful non-detachable convertible device with options that include Intel Xeon processors and an Nvidia Quadro graphics card. “Non-detachable” is an important distinction to make because although the CPU options here would trump any convertible (such as the Dell XPS 15 9575), and the Quadro P1000 performs well in design and CAD tasks, it loses to the consumer Nvidia GTX 1060 in the Microsoft Surface Book 2 in many less specialized workloads.

The Xeon and Quadro allude to the target audience of this device, and HP has included an HP-branded Wacom AES pen with a professional-grade 4000 levels of sensitivity for fine-grained control. The screen covers 100% of the AdobeRGB color spectrum, making it ideal for creating work that appears identical in reproduction and printing. With options for up to 4 TB of NVMe M.2 SSDs, there is plenty of high-speed storage for purposes such as scratch disk usage during video editing.

The HP ZBook Studio G5 isn't yet available for purchase, with the product page showing a "notify me" option in place of the "buy me" button.

HP ZBook Studio x360 G5:

  • Processor:

    • Intel i5-8300H 4C/8T 2.6/4.0 GHz
    • Intel i7-8750H 6C/12T 2.2/4.1 GHz
    • Intel i5-8400H vPro™ 4C/8T 2.5/4.2 GHz
    • Intel i7-8850H vPro™ 6C/12T 2.6/4.3 GHz
    • Intel Xeon E-2176M vPro 6C/12T 2.7/4.4 GHz
    • Intel Xeon E-2186M vPro 6C/12T 2.9/4.6 GHz

  • Memory: 2 slots, up to 32 GB DDR4-2666 ECC or non-ECC
  • Graphics:

    • Intel UHD 630 (Core i-series)
    • Intel UHD P630 (Xeon)
    • Nvidia Quadro P1000 (optional)

  • Storage: Up to 2 TB NVMe M.2 (spec sheet), up to 4 TB NVMe (product page)
  • Display:

    • 15.6-inch 1920 x 1080 FHD IPS eDP touch screen (400 cd/m²)
    • 15.6-inch 3840 x 2160 4K UHD IPS eDP touch screen (400 cd/m²)
    • HP Sure View 15.6-inch 1920 x 1080 FHD IPS touch screen (650 cd/m²)
    • HP DreamColor 15.6-inch 3840 x 2160 4K UHD IPS anti-glare touch screen (600 cd/m²)
    • Ports: 1x HDMI 2.0; 2x USB 3.0; 1x headphone/microphone combo; 1 power connector; 2x Thunderbolt 3

  • Ports: 1x HDMI 2.0; 2x USB 3.0; 1x headphone/microphone combo; 1 power connector; 2x Thunderbolt 3
  • Networking: Intel 9560 802.11ac 2x2 + Bluetooth 5.0; HP lt4132 LTE/HSPA+ 4G or Intel XMM 7360 LTE Advanced
  • Battery: 64 WHr or 95.6 WHr with 150 W power supply
  • Dimensions: 360 x 254 x 20 mm (14.17 x 9.65 x 0.8 inches)
  • Weight: starting at 2.26 kg (4.99 pounds)
HP ZBook Studio x360 G5. (Source: HP)
HP ZBook Studio x360 G5. (Source: HP)
HP ZBook Studio x360 G5. (Source: HP)
HP ZBook Studio x360 G5. (Source: HP)
HP ZBook Studio x360 G5. (Source: HP)
HP ZBook Studio x360 G5. (Source: HP)

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2018 04 > HP announces the ZBook Studio X360 G5 with workstation internals in a consumer-style body
Craig Ward, 2018-04- 5 (Update: 2018-04- 6)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.