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Gigabyte introduces two new Celeron-based BRIX mini-PCs with both fanless and active-cooling options

The Gigabyte BRIX BLCE-4000C (fanless) and BLCE-4105C (active). (Source: Gigabyte)
The Gigabyte BRIX BLCE-4000C (fanless) and BLCE-4105C (active). (Source: Gigabyte)
Gigabyte have released a redesign of their entry-level BRIX mini-PCs with an overlapping white trim around the standard black box. The front is curved and the top is adorned with a diamond pattern. The two new celeron models are the fanless BLCE-4000C and actively-cooled BLCE-4105C.

Gigabyte has released details about the BLCE-4000C, an updated design in the entry-level fanless line, which includes an overlapping white trim and interlocking diamond pattern. Gigabyte’s BRIX mini-PCs are a good option for those who need a basic desktop computer for tasks where a notebook isn’t suitable due to the additional expense of the attached screen and keyboard, or in integrated setups. The entry-level fanless models have the advantage of being silent, making them useful for quiet offices or as home theatre PCs.

The BLCE-4000C comes as a barebones kit including case, motherboard, CPU, cooling solution, and I/O. It is up to the buyer to add their own RAM, storage, operating system, and peripherals. The specifications provided by Gigabyte are:

  • Intel Celeron N4000 1.1/2.6 GHz 2C/2T (6 Watt TDP) #1
  • Intel UHD 600
  • 1 x SODIMM DDR4-2400 MHz (max 8 GB)
  • 1 x 2.5-inch HDD/SSD slot (max 9.5 mm thick)
  • Intel 3168 dual-band 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2, and 1000 Mbps LAN
  • 1 x M.2 2230 A-E slot (occupied by Intel 3168)
  • Front I/O: 1 x USB3, 1 x USB3-C, 2.5mm headphone and microphone jacks
  • Rear I/O: 1 x HDMI 1.4b, 2 x USB3, 1 x RJ45, 1 x VGA
  • 56 mm x 103 mm x 116 mm (2.21" x 4.06" x 4.59")
  • Volume: 0.67 Litre

Gigabyte confusingly lists 1920 x 1080 60 Hz as the maximum resolution supported by the BLCE-4000C (and BLCE-4105C). However, both the UHD600 and the HDMI 1.4b spec support 4K so this strange decision limits the usefulness for HTPC setups. Since the BLCE-4000C and 4105C use 2.5-inch storage (e.g. 2 TB HDD) rather than M.2, they are well suited to storing large Blu-ray backups and 4K video and would be capable of playing this content. Along those lines, don’t believe the overview page — These models aren't graphics powerhouses, and you won’t be playing the latest 3D games or making 3D models.

No information was provided on price or availability.

#1 For those who don’t mind a little fan noise, the BLCE-4105C is an actively cooled variant which uses the more powerful Celeron J4105 1.5/2.5 GHz 4C/4T (10 Watt TDP)

Top side of the Gigabyte BRIX BLCE-4000C (fanless) and BLCE-4105C (active). (Source: Gigabyte)
Top side of the Gigabyte BRIX BLCE-4000C (fanless) and BLCE-4105C (active). (Source: Gigabyte)
Rear I/O of the Gigabyte BRIX BLCE-4000C (fanless) and BLCE-4105C (active). (Source: Gigabyte)
Rear I/O of the Gigabyte BRIX BLCE-4000C (fanless) and BLCE-4105C (active). (Source: Gigabyte)
Front I/O of the Gigabyte BRIX BLCE-4000C (fanless) and BLCE-4105C (active). (Source: Gigabyte)
Front I/O of the Gigabyte BRIX BLCE-4000C (fanless) and BLCE-4105C (active). (Source: Gigabyte)

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2018 03 > Gigabyte introduces two new Celeron-based BRIX mini-PCs with both fanless and active-cooling options
Craig Ward, 2018-03-23 (Update: 2018-03-23)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.