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Computex 2019 | Gigabyte Aero 17 is finally here with 240 Hz FHD and 4K UHD HDR options

Gigabyte Aero 17 is finally here with 240 Hz FHD and 4K UHD HDR options
Gigabyte Aero 17 is finally here with 240 Hz FHD and 4K UHD HDR options
The upcoming 17.3-inch system will be just 0.2 inches thicker and 0.8 pounds heavier than the new Aero 15 with a different set of display options. Most core configurable options will be the same between them.

Gigabyte will be adding a third member to its Aero family today with the reveal of the 17.3-inch Aero 17. The new system joins the existing 15.6-inch Aero 15 and 14-inch Aero 14 to complete the flagship series designed for both gamers and professionals.

Much like the new upcoming Aero 15, the Aero 17 utilizes the same design language with an emphasis on cooling. Display options for the Aero 17 will be different as there is not yet a 17.3-inch OLED panel for mass market use. Instead, the system will offer 144 Hz IPS, 240 Hz IGZO, and 4K UHD HDR options.

CPU, GPU, storage, AC adapter, battery, RAM, and port options will otherwise be identical between the Aero 15 and Aero 17 including the Core i9-9880H CPU, Killer E2600 and Wi-Fi 6 connectivity, and up to the RTX 2080 Max-Q GPU with base GTX 16 SKUs.

No word yet on when we can expect the Aero 17 to become available or if it will launch simultaneously with the new Aero 15 in June. In the meantime, see our images and preliminary specifications below.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 05 > Gigabyte Aero 17 is finally here with 240 Hz FHD and 4K UHD HDR options
Allen Ngo, 2019-05-28 (Update: 2019-05-28)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.