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Foxconn claimed to be expanding iPhone production in India

Foxconn could be investing up to US$1 billion into their iPhone production plant in India. (Image source: Foxconn)
Foxconn could be investing up to US$1 billion into their iPhone production plant in India. (Image source: Foxconn)
Foxconn, the Taiwanese manufacturing giant is said to be investing US$1 billion into their iPhone production plant in India. Foxconn has factories right around the world, but India is currently the only location outside of China where they assemble iPhones.
Craig Ward,

Sources speaking to Reuters claim that Foxconn will invest US$1 billion into their manufacturing site near Chennai. The investment, which will be spread over three years, is said to be driven by an Apple directive to move a more substantial portion of iPhone production out of China.

Apple is likely concerned about their exposure to Chinese manufacturing in the midst of an ongoing trade war. Currently, this plant covers iPhone XR production, but this expansion would include the tooling needed for manufacturing other models. Up to 6000 new jobs could be created at the factory.

While spreading production across multiple countries can increase supply chain costs, the additional factories help reduce the impact of global political or medical events. Foxconn ceased iPhone production during the COVID-19 lockdown in India, and had stopped production for a short time in China too. The possible scenario of having no iPhone production facilities worked will be less likely if this insider information proves to be correct.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 07 > Foxconn claimed to be expanding iPhone production in India
Craig Ward, 2020-07-12 (Update: 2020-07-12)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.