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Doogee announces T6 smartphone with built-in power bank

Doogee announces T6 smartphone with built-in power bank
Doogee announces T6 smartphone with built-in power bank
The 5.5-inch smartphone doubles as a charger for other portable devices.

The HomTom HT6 announced in early August has been rebranded under the Doogee name as the Doogee T6. The smartphone will carry almost the same specifications and hardware as the HT6 including the 2 GB RAM, 5.5-inch 720p display, Mali-T720 GPU, 6250 mAh battery, dual-SIM support, and 4G FDD LTE bands. Instead, the main difference lies in the CPU as the HT6 will use the more powerful 1.3 GHz MT6735P versus the 1.0 GHz MT6735 processor on the T6.

The unique draw of the T6 will be its ability to charge other devices via its dense 6250 mAh battery pack. Even the large 6-inch Nexus 6 phablet carries a battery capacity of just 3220 mAh, which is nearly half of the T6. This means that the Doogee can be used to charge multiple smartphones or a single smartphone multiple times before needing to recharge itself. 2A fast-charging is also supported, so charging the T6 shouldn't take twice as long as a normal smartphone despite the huge capacity.

The Chinese manufacturer claims a battery life of 101 hours on a full charge, though Doogee neglects to mention if this will be talk time or standby time. The super-sized battery has bumped thickness to 9.9 mm compared to 7.3 mm of the iPhone 6s Plus.

The Doogee T6 launches this November for an unknown price. The current HomTom HT6 retails for $140, so the T6 will likely retail for even less.

Source(s)

Doogee

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 10 > Doogee announces T6 smartphone with built-in power bank
Allen Ngo, 2015-10-25 (Update: 2015-10-25)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.