Notebookcheck

Customers showing more interest in an iPod than the Apple Watch

Customers showing more interest in an iPod than the Apple Watch
Customers showing more interest in an iPod than the Apple Watch
According to analysts, the Apple Watch is generating less hype and attention than the manufacturer had anticipated.

Is the Apple Watch a flop?

According to Analyst Andy Hargreaves of Pacific Crest, interest in the high-end smartwatch has steadily declined since its launch in April. Hargreaves is basing his conclusions on Google Trends data, however, so the exact extent of this as a sales indicator may not be entirely reliable. Nonetheless, the figures are interesting and worthy of attention.

As part of the analysis, search queries revolving around the word "Apple" were evaluated and the Apple Watch turned out lukewarm at best. Customers are apparently more interested in the iPad and even the iPod in comparison. The latter is particularly surprising considering that the iPod series in general has been waning.

Hargreaves speculates that the Cupertino company will still manage to sell 11 million Apple Watches by this September. This is certainly not bad considering that an estimated 6.8 million smartwatches were sold in all of 2014 worldwide.

According to Smart Watch Group who tracks sales of the wearable device, Samsung sold the most smartwatches in 2014 with around 1.2 million units totaling over 300 million USD. This corresponds to a market share of 23 percent before the turn of the year.

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 06 > Customers showing more interest in an iPod than the Apple Watch
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-06-18 (Update: 2015-06-18)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.