Notebookcheck

Next Apple Watch may include FaceTime and be more independent from iPhone

Next Apple Watch may include FaceTime and be more independent from iPhone
Next Apple Watch may include FaceTime and be more independent from iPhone
Apple is purportedly planning a camera for the inevitable second generation of Watch models.

So far, consumer interest in the Apple Watch has been relatively low compared to other Apple devices despite the massive advertising efforts from the Cupertino company. Many analysts and market observers have adjusted their sales forecasts of the Apple Watch in response to the lukewarm reception. Reviewers are generally in agreement that the Watch offers little value for the price.

Another criticism is that the Watch requires an iPhone for many of its core functions including email and weather updates. According to recent rumors, Apple will be addressing many of these issues with the second generation Watch currently slated for a 2016 release. The new model is expected to include a camera to allow for FaceTime when the user is answering a call.

Additionally, WiFi functionality will improve with additional features. The current Watch has built-in functions such as Fitness Tracking, music playback, and mobile payments, but the next Apple Watch will supposedly introduce a "Find my Watch" feature to quickly put the device on lockdown in case if it is ever stolen.

Battery life is an ongoing issue, though the source claims that the Watch 2 will be even more energy-efficient than the current generation. Other configurations will likely be available as well ranging anywhere from 1000 to 10000 Euros.

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 06 > Next Apple Watch may include FaceTime and be more independent from iPhone
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-06-21 (Update: 2015-06-21)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.