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Bluboo reveals Xwatch smartwatch with Android Wear

Bluboo reveals Xwatch smartwatch with Android Wear
Bluboo reveals Xwatch smartwatch with Android Wear
Smartwatch to come with built-in altimeter, GPS, barometer, and heart rate sensor.

The smartwatch sector is getting crowded as more Chinese manufacturers are jumping in. Doogee recently revealed its first smartwatch back in July and now Bluboo is doing the same with its Xwatch smartwatch.

Bluboo is calling the Xwatch the world's first "real" sports smartwatch due to its four primary sensors that the company deems are vital for athletes: GPS, altimeter, heart rate sensor, and barometer. The device will be the first - if not one of the very few - to include all sensors above while running Android Wear.

Unfortunately, Bluboo has not announced any other details on the Xwatch aside from the admittedly attractive renders. Hardware specifications are still unknown including the size of the round display, SoC, RAM, battery life, and other core features. Important questions remain unanswered: Will the device be waterproof? What materials are used for the case? How much will the Xwatch cost?

The manufacturer expects to launch the Xwatch later this year and is looking to compete directly against the second generation Moto 360. We will likely find out more about the smartwatch in the coming weeks.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 10 > Bluboo reveals Xwatch smartwatch with Android Wear
Allen Ngo, 2015-10-14 (Update: 2015-10-14)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.