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Bluboo Xtouch will use 3D-printed back covers

Bluboo Xtouch will use 3D-printed back covers
Bluboo Xtouch will use 3D-printed back covers
The 5-inch smartphone will be one of the first smartphones to utilize 3D printers at the mass production level.

3D printers are always finding their way into mainstream news outlets due to their wide creative appeal. At CES, we've seen them being used for creating everything from toys to edible chocolate.

Of course, it was only a matter of time before the technology expanded into commercial manufacturing. Bluboo has announced that the Xtouch will be the very first global smartphone to be at least partially made with 3D printers. More specifically, the removable back cover will be made of nano-composite materials crafted from 3D printing. The manufacturer claims that the technique will improve production precision whilst decreasing production hurdles. Although not explicitly stated, we're pretty sure that it will dramatically reduce production costs as well. The end result is a flexible back shell with a crystalline luster.

The Xtouch is a 5-inch smartphone with mainstream specifications such as its FHD display, 3 GB RAM, MediaTek MT6753 SoC, and 16 GB of internal memory. Its most appealing feature is its starting price of just $99 USD for pre-ordering. A higher-end configuration with 4 GB RAM and a faster MediaTek MT6795 SoC will be available for $149.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 11 > Bluboo Xtouch will use 3D-printed back covers
Allen Ngo, 2015-11- 2 (Update: 2015-11- 2)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.