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ROG:REDEFINE 2019 | Asus gets gaming essentials right with the ROG Strix G G531 and G731

Asus ROG Strix G series. (Source: Asus)
Asus ROG Strix G series. (Source: Asus)
The Asus ROG Strix G-series is touted to be an affordable option for gamers to experience the core ROG features without having to break the bank. The new ROG Strix G notebooks are available in G531 and G731 variants and will feature 9th gen Intel Core i7 CPUs and GPU options up to the NVIDIA RTX 2070. Also on offer is a new design language inspired by Asus's recent partnership with the BMW Designworks Group.

Asus is positioning the Strix G an an affordable option that still retains the core ROG experience. The latest ROG Strix G can be configured up to the 9th gen Intel Core 17-9750H CPU and an NVIDIA RTX 2070 GPU. The Strix G is available in two variants — the 15.6-inch Strix G G531 and the 17.3-inch Strix G G731.

Like the Scar III and Hero III, the Strix G is also inspired by BMW Designworks Group's design aesthetic that combines elements of the classic ROG design with a stealthy yet stylish vibe. An optional RGB light bar can be configured at the bottom of the chassis. The keyboard can be optionally configured with four-zone RGB lighting that syncs with other RGB peripherals via Aura Sync.

The Strix G can be configured with up to the RTX 2070 that can boost up to 1440 MHz at 115 W in Turbo mode. The RTX 2070 helps to take advantage of 144 Hz panels and supports ray-tracing and AI in games built to take advantage of it. The laptop can also be configured with up to 32 GB of DDR4-2666 RAM and a combination of an M.2 NVMe SSD and a standard 2.5-inch HDD or SSHD.

Like the other ROG notebooks we've seen today, the ROG Strix G-series laptops also feature improved cooling solutions that include three heatsinks with 189 0.1 mm fins and dual 12 V fans. Depending on the GPU configuration, up to five heat pipes form part of an extended heat spreader located underneath the keyboard. On the software side, specific performance profiles help in making best use of the available hardware for all kinds of workflows.

Similar to the Scar III and Hero III, the 15.6-inch Strix G G531 integrates a virtual numpad into the trackpad while the 17.3-inch G731 has a dedicated numpad. There is no ROG Keystone support, however. Other standard wireless and peripheral connectivity options are available across both the SKUs.

The Asus ROG Strix G G531 and G731 are available worldwide although, pricing and availability of various configuration options are region dependent.

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L to R: Asus ROG Strix Hero III, Scar III, and Strix G.
L to R: Asus ROG Strix Hero III, Scar III, and Strix G.
(Source: Asus)
(Source: Asus)
(Source: Asus)
(Source: Asus)
(Source: Asus)
(Source: Asus)

Source(s)

Asus Press Release

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 04 > Asus gets gaming essentials right with the ROG Strix G G531 and G731
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2019-04-23 (Update: 2019-04-23)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.