Notebookcheck

iPhone 13: rumored portless shift to MagSafe, 120 Hz display, possibility of an in-display fingerprint sensor, and a confirmed Snapdragon X60 5G modem

iPhone 13 is expected to feature the Snapdragon X60 5G modem and may finally sport a 120 Hz display. (Image Source: Apple)
iPhone 13 is expected to feature the Snapdragon X60 5G modem and may finally sport a 120 Hz display. (Image Source: Apple)
Even as the iPhone 12 is still pretty new, rumors about the iPhone 13 have already started making the rounds. The iPhone 13 (or whatever it will be called) may go completely portless in favor of the new MagSafe technology and is also likely to sport a 120 Hz displays. An in-display fingerprint sensor is a possibility a Qualcomm Snapdragon X60 5G modem is more or less confirmed.

The iPhone 12 series is still fresh from the oven, but rumor tidbits about next year's iPhones have already started making their way online. This year's iPhones sport great hardware no doubt, but they disappointed prospective buyers in one major aspect — lack of high-refresh rate displays, which has almost become a staple feature in the Android world today. The iPhone 13 (or whatever it will be called) may finally include high-refresh rate displays similar to the iPad Pro.

Replying to YouTuber Sam Sheffer on Twitter, known Apple leaker Jon Prosser seems to be confident that the iPhone 13 will indeed sport 120 Hz displays. Prosser also ruled out the possibility of USB-C and predicted a 50-50 chance for an in-display fingerprint sensor on the next wave of Apple iPhones.

While many expected Apple to move to a more universal USB-C charging solution, the iPhone 12 still uses the company's proprietary Lightning connector. However, with Apple introducing the MagSafe ecosystem that enables easy wireless charging and hooking up compatible accessories, we may not see a USB-C port on the iPhone at all. In fact, Prosser even goes on to say that Apple may make upcoming iPhones completely portless. Of course, this also depends on how well the MagSafe ecosystem matures in the next year or so.

The other new feature that will surely make its way to the iPhone 13 (at least on the iPhone 13 Pro and Pro Max models) is Qualcomm's new Snapdragon X60 5G modem. The iPhone 12 series uses the Snapdragon X55 5G modem since that was the latest available Qualcomm offering during the iPhone 12 development process. Now, an excerpt from the Apple-Qualcomm settlement filing unearthed first by Danny Walsh on Twitter and posted by MacRumors reads,

Apple intends to commercially launch (i) New Models of Apple Products during the time period between June 1, 2020 and May 31, 2021 (the "2020 Launch"), some of which use the SDX55 Qualcomm Chipset, (ii) New Models of Apple Products during the time period between June 1, 2021 and May 31, 2022 (the "2021 Launch"), some of which use the SDX60 Qualcomm Chipset, and (iii) New Models of Apple Products during the time period between June 1, 2022 and May 31, 2024 (the "2022/23 Launch"), some of which use the SDX65 or SDX70 Qualcomm Chipsets (each a "Launch" and collectively the "Launches")."

For those not in the know, Qualcomm introduced the Snapdragon X60 5G modem in February this year. The Snapdragon X60 is fabbed on TSMC's 5 nm process and can aggregate 5G mmWave and sub-6 GHz bands while also supporting aggregation of sub-6 GHz TDD and FDD bands so that carriers can maximize spectrum usage and capacity by combining the high performance of mmWave with the wider range of sub-6 GHz. The Snapdragon X60 modem also supports Voice over New Radio, which alleviates the need to fallback on 4G for voice usage.

Read all 5 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 10 > iPhone 13: rumored portless shift to MagSafe, 120 Hz display, possibility of an in-display fingerprint sensor, and a confirmed Snapdragon X60 5G modem
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2020-10-26 (Update: 2020-10-26)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.