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With lighting: Turn your Raspberry Pi into a NAS for 3.5-inch drives

With lighting: Project turns the Raspberry Pi into a NAS for 3.5-inch drives. (Image source: HarryTheB)
With lighting: Project turns the Raspberry Pi into a NAS for 3.5-inch drives. (Image source: HarryTheB)
Fancy making your Raspberry Pi into a NAS? Well, how about giving it a unique design too? If both tickle your fancy, then a new project posted on Hackaday.io is worth checking out. The flying saucer design event features a "cow abduction beam".
Alex Alderson,

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While there are many ways to put a Raspberry Pi to use as a NAS, a project posted on Hackaday.io caught our eye. Larger and arguably more ambitious than the PiNAS on which we reported a few days ago. The project, posted by Hackaday.io member HarryTheB, is more than a NAS too.

The so-called Flying saucer clock (and NAS!) is, as its name suggests, a clock, a flying saucer case and a NAS. While the build includes two drive bays as the PiNAS does, the Flying saucer clock can house 3.5-inch drives. By contrast, the PiNAS only has space for 2.5-inch drives.

As the photo below shows, the Flying saucer clock can report hours and minutes simultaneously, with HarryTheB including 60 neopixel LEDs for minutes and 12 to denote hours. While the Flying saucer clock looks impressive, a lot of work has gone into creating it.

According to the project page, the design requires 1.8 kg of filament and took 112 hours to print. The case consists of numerous parts that must be screwed together, too. There are also reams of cables, not least because of the unit's 84 LEDs. The two 3.5-inch drives can be connected via a simple USB SATA adapter, though. Meanwhile, the Raspberry Pi controls the LEDs via its GPIO. The Flying saucer clock can display special lighting effects, too.

HarryTheB has uploaded the parts list, 3D print templates, build instructions and program code should you be interested in making a Flying saucer clock yourself. Please see the project page for more information.

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(Image source: HarryTheB)

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Alex Alderson
Alex Alderson - Senior Tech Writer - 4126 articles published on Notebookcheck since 2018
Prior to writing and translating for Notebookcheck, I worked for various companies including Apple and Neowin. I have a BA in International History and Politics from the University of Leeds, which I have since converted to a Law Degree. Happy to chat on Twitter or Notebookchat.
contact me via: @aldersonaj
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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 02 > With lighting: Turn your Raspberry Pi into a NAS for 3.5-inch drives
Alex Alderson, 2020-02-23 (Update: 2020-02-23)