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Windows 11: No Trusted Platform Module? Many AMD and Intel processors can run Microsoft's new OS without a dedicated TPM 2.0 chip

You do not need a dedicated TPM 2.0 chip to run Windows 11. (Image source: Microsoft)
You do not need a dedicated TPM 2.0 chip to run Windows 11. (Image source: Microsoft)
You do not need a dedicated TPM 2.0 chip to run Windows 11, contrary to Microsoft's system requirements. Instead, almost all modern AMD and Intel processors already meet Microsoft's TPM 2.0 requirement, and only a BIOS setting may be preventing you from upgrading your PC to Windows 11.

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Microsoft's Windows 11 system requirements have caused a stir, not least because of the seemingly arbitrary processor limits. Microsoft also states that a machine must have a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) and a 2.0 version at that. While many modern laptops have a TPM 2.0 chip, desktop motherboards do not. Anecdotally, our Gigabyte AORUS PRO WIFI X570 motherboard has a TPM header, but no TPM chip.

On the face of it, we would need to purchase a TPM 2.0 chip to run Windows 11, which currently sell for exorbitant amounts. Initially, Microsoft stated that a TPM 1.2 chip would do, but it has since clarified that only TPM 2.0 will do. However, that is not necessarily the case, despite Microsoft's insistence to the contrary.

If your machine does not have a dedicated TPM chip, your CPU may have an equivalent built in. Specifically, Intel integrates Platform Trust Technology (Intel PTT) in its modern processors, while AMD uses something called PSP fTPM. Many motherboard manufacturers disable these by default, but you can enable them from within your motherboard's BIOS. Every BIOS is different, so we would recommend reading your motherboard's manual first. For example, Gigabyte stored the AMD PSP fTPM setting under Advanced CPU Settings.

In short, you do not necessarily need to rush out and purchase a TPM chip to run Windows 11 on your desktop machine. Hopefully, Microsoft clarifies this in its Windows 11 system requirements at some stage, because Intel and AMD do not readily market their PTT and PSP fTPM technologies as TPM 2.0 alternatives. Microsoft has also released its inaugural Windows 11 Insider Preview build and has updated its processor requirements to accommodate the Zen 1 and 7th Generation Core families.

As far as we can tell, there is only one downside to using Intel PTT or AMD PSP fTPM over a dedicated TPM 2.0 chip. If you enable BitLocker, then all your keys will be saved to your processor, not a separate chip. Hence, changing your processor will remove your BitLocker keys and will cause problems. Not enabling BitLocker would avoid these problems, though.

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Intel PTT on an ASRock motherboard. (Image source: Bleeping Computer)
Intel PTT on an ASRock motherboard. (Image source: Bleeping Computer)
AMD PSP fTPM on an ASUS motherboard. (Image source: Bleeping Computer)
AMD PSP fTPM on an ASUS motherboard. (Image source: Bleeping Computer)
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Alex Alderson
Alex Alderson - Senior Tech Writer - 4146 articles published on Notebookcheck since 2018
Prior to writing and translating for Notebookcheck, I worked for various companies including Apple and Neowin. I have a BA in International History and Politics from the University of Leeds, which I have since converted to a Law Degree. Happy to chat on Twitter or Notebookchat.
contact me via: @aldersonaj
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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2021 06 > Windows 11: No Trusted Platform Module? Many AMD and Intel processors can run Microsoft's new OS without a dedicated TPM 2.0 chip
Alex Alderson, 2021-06-29 (Update: 2021-06-30)