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Windows 11: The Blue Screen of Death is no more

Windows 11 will present a Black Screen of Death, even though one already exists. (Image source: The Verge - edited)
Windows 11 will present a Black Screen of Death, even though one already exists. (Image source: The Verge - edited)
The Blue Screen of Death has reached cult status, especially since Microsoft's infamous Windows 98 presentation. However, Microsoft has finally axed the Blue Screen as of Windows 11, although the change may save your eyes if your machine crashes at night.

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Microsoft has integrated many new features in Windows 11, some of which are already available to try out in its initial Insider Preview build. Android app emulation will arrive in later builds, but improved Snap Assist options are some of the most useful features we have noticed so far. A change that we have not encountered is the one that Microsoft has made to the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD). While the current build still shows a Green Screen of Death, as is the case with beta versions, The Verge reports that Microsoft will switch to a Black Screen for the release build.

The BSOD has received several major updates since the days of Windows 1.0. Microsoft revised the BSOD in Windows 95, for example, and added a sad smiley in 2012 on Windows 8. Most recently, the company added a QR code to the BSOD in 2016, albeit only in Windows 10. However, the colour has remained unchanged for the best part of 30 years.

Microsoft has not explained why it has switched to a Black Screen of Death with Windows 11. Black Screens have been a part of Windows for decades too, although they are not as infamous as the BSOD, which even popped up during a Windows 98 presentation. Ultimately, a Black Screen of Death may not look as jarring as a Blue Screen of Death, which is a good thing in our books.

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(Image source: The Verge)

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The Verge & Screen Post - Image credit

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Alex Alderson
Alex Alderson - Senior Tech Writer - 4146 articles published on Notebookcheck since 2018
Prior to writing and translating for Notebookcheck, I worked for various companies including Apple and Neowin. I have a BA in International History and Politics from the University of Leeds, which I have since converted to a Law Degree. Happy to chat on Twitter or Notebookchat.
contact me via: @aldersonaj
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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2021 07 > Windows 11: The Blue Screen of Death is no more
Alex Alderson, 2021-07- 2 (Update: 2021-07- 2)