Notebookcheck
, , , , , ,
search relation.
, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
 

Windows 11's strict hardware requirements cannot be bypassed, Microsoft admits, "We know it sucks... we will still block you"

Windows 11's CPU and security requirements cannot by bypassed in the official release. (Image Source: Microsoft)
Windows 11's CPU and security requirements cannot by bypassed in the official release. (Image Source: Microsoft)
Microsoft's Program Manager Aria Carley has confirmed that it would not be possible to bypass Windows 11's TPM 2.0 and Secure Boot requirements once the OS launches some time in October. Insider builds can currently be installed on a wider range of Intel and AMD CPUs, but the OS will support only Intel 8th gen and above and AMD Ryzen 2000 and above consumer processors at launch with no way to bypass these enforcements.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! English native speakers welcome!

News Writer - Details here

Microsoft is expected to launch Windows 11 some time in October with those in the Insider program already being able to test pre-release builds of the operating system (OS). One of the primary contentions with the new OS is that the official system requirements mandate the presence of a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0 chip.

While TPM 2.0 and Secure Boot requirements can be bypassed via a registry hack, Microsoft has now confirmed that these methods will not work once the OS becomes widely available.

This information comes from Microsoft Program Manager Aria Carley who, in a response to a question whether devices not fully compatible with Windows 11 would be offered the update via Windows Update, said,

So we talk about this new hardware floor of what devices are eligible and which aren't. And we know it sucks that some aren't going to be eligible for Windows 11. But the reason we're doing that is to keep devices more productive, have a better experience, and most importantly have better security than before so they can stay protected in this new workforce."

Further, responding to whether these safeguards can be bypassed via a group policy edit, Carley said,

That group policy will not enable you to get around the hardware enforcement for Windows 11. We're still going to block you from upgrading your device to an unsupported state since we really want to make sure that your devices stay supported and secure."

This news can be dampening for many who wish to experience the new OS but are being left out despite sporting perfectly capable hardware. For instance, those with AMD Ryzen 1000, Threadripper 1000, and Intel 7th gen and below CPUs are left out from the upgrade.

Microsoft is evaluating performance of Windows 11 on these unsupported CPUs via feedback from the Insider program, but there's no guarantee we will see support for them at launch.

That being said, since Microsoft does offer OEMs a special image that does not warrant a TPM in special cases, it is very much possible that someone will eventually find a way to bypass this.

For those that do have a compatible CPU, be sure to enable your processor's built-in firmware TPM in the BIOS/UEFI — PTT (Platform Trust Technology) for Intel and fTPM (firmware TPM) for AMD.

Aria Carley's answers can be found from the 6:00 mark in the video below.

Buy the AMD Ryzen 7 5800X on Amazon

, , , , , ,
search relation.
, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
 

Source(s)

Microsoft Tech Community on YouTube via BetaNews

List of Windows 11 supported AMD and Intel processors

Read all 32 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - Managing Editor - 1392 articles published on Notebookcheck since 2012
Though a cell and molecular biologist by training, I have been drawn towards computers from a very young age ever since I got my first PC in 1998. My passion for technology grew quite exponentially with the times, and it has been an incredible experience from being a much solicited source for tech advice and troubleshooting among family and friends to joining Notebookcheck in 2017 as a professional tech journalist. Now, I am a Lead Editor at Notebookcheck covering news and reviews encompassing a wide gamut of the technology landscape for Indian and global audiences. When I am not hunting for the next big story or taking complex measurements for reviews, you can find me unwinding to a nice read, listening to some soulful music, or trying out a new game.
contact me via: @Geeky_Vaidy
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2021 07 > Windows 11's strict hardware requirements cannot be bypassed, Microsoft admits, "We know it sucks... we will still block you"
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2021-07-31 (Update: 2021-07-31)